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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The attorney general hugged community leaders, a highway patrol captain and the mother of Michael Brown during his visit, and got an update on the federal investigation into the teen's shooting.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · At McCluer High School, 30 varsity football players — all black, mostly from Ferguson — practice. David Greene talks to Sports Illustrated writer Robert Klemko about his story, "Football in Ferguson."
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · Kelly McEvers talks to Syria expert Shashank Joshi, about President Bashar al-Assad's tenacious grip on power. Joshi is with the Royal Services Institute in London.
 

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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The aftermath of the police shooting in Ferguson, Mo., has focused attention on police-involved killings more broadly in the U.S. But statistics on shootings by police are scarce. To learn why, Audie Cornish speaks with David Klinger, an associate professor at the University of Missouri in St. Louis.
 
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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The hunt is on to identify the man in the James Foley execution video who speaks with a British accent. An estimated 2,000 Europeans have left home to join the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · An Israeli airstrike killed three Hamas military commanders, who were buried shortly later amid threats that the militant group would respond.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Morning Edition for March 28, 2012

Mar 28, 2012 — A new method of obtaining organs for transplantation has some in the medical community questioning whether donors are technically "dead." The controversy centers around how one defines "dead" — something that turns out to be pretty complicated.
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Mar 28, 2012 — The justices will hear arguments Wednesday over whether the health law's expansion of Medicaid for the poor unfairly forces the states to participate. And their decision could greatly affect the relationship between the federal government and the states.
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Mar 28, 2012 — This weekend, college basketball fans will be glued to TVs and computer monitors to keep tabs on the NCAA's Final Four. But as much as people love filling out brackets, the sport is being hurt by anonymous "one and done" players, says Frank Deford.
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Mar 28, 2012 — Gangster and samurai movies have long dominated the Japanese film industry, and both genres require high body counts. Kirareyaku, or "sliced-up actors," specialize in meeting that need. The group's leading light, Seizo Fukumoto, has died at least 50,000 times — on screen.
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Mar 28, 2012 — More than 17,000 sound recordings made by the famed folklorist are now available, for free.
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Mar 27, 2012 — U.S. archer Khatuna Lorig hopes to return to the Olympics this summer. But she's already helped put archery into The Hunger Games this spring — by training the film's star, Jennifer Lawrence. In the film's kill-or-be-killed competition, Lawrence's character relies on her ability with a bow.
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more Morning Edition for March 28, 2012 from NPR