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July 29, 2014 | NPR · House and Senate negotiators reached a compromise, $17 billion agreement to improve medical care for veterans. The deal comes in the final week before Congress leaves town for a monthlong recess.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Washington Post reporter Liz Sly tells Renee Montagne that U.S. arms may be flowing to moderate Syrian rebels, but the aid seems to be too little too late to affect the course of the civil war.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · The militant group threatens to kill parents who immunize their children. As a result, polio has come roaring back in Pakistan. Eradication now hinges on whether the country can control the virus.
 

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July 29, 2014 | KERA · After caring for Ebola patients for several months in West Africa, Dr. Kent Brantly noticed last week that he had symptoms. The 33-year-old immediately put himself into a Liberian isolation ward.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Virologist Thomas Geisbert has spent decades studying Ebola and other hemorrhagic fevers. He speaks to Audie Cornish about the current Ebola outbreak, the worst in history, and how it might be contained this time around.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · The Eid festival, which celebrates the end of Ramadan, serves as a time for visiting relatives and exchanging gifts. But one family's holiday in Gaza traces the death and displacement wrought by the war between Hamas and Israel.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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medical treatments

Jul 29, 2014 — We spend $15 billion a year training doctors but end up with a medical workforce that doesn't meet the nation's health care needs, according to an Institute of Medicine Report.
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Jul 21, 2014 — Over the past few decades, tuberculosis has evolved into dangerous forms that can't be killed by traditional antibiotics. But there's a new weapon in the pipeline to wipe out the deadly infection.
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Jul 21, 2014 — It's been tough to identify the problems that only turn up after medicines are on the market. An experimental project is now combing through data to get earlier, more accurate warnings.
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Jun 26, 2014 — Many people use products using benzoyl peroxide or salicylic acid to treat acne. The Food and Drug Administration says rare but dangerous allergic reactions have landed people in the hospital.
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Jun 11, 2014 — Pro athletes and duffers alike are trying injections of platelet-rich plasma to treat chronic injuries like tennis elbow. But despite thousands of studies, it's not clear that the treatment works.
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Jun 10, 2014 — More people are using insulin to control Type 2 diabetes, and most of those people are using newer analog forms. But patients pay more out of pocket for these drugs, a study finds.
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Jun 9, 2014 — Boys are more likely to be diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder than girls, though both sexes are equally affected. Women are increasingly seeking treatment as young adults.
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Jun 2, 2014 — Women with multiple sclerosis often find that they have fewer problems when they are expecting. That led researchers to develop an experimental drug based on a hormone associated with pregnancy.
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Jun 2, 2014 — Lots of people have heartburn or gastric reflux, and not all of them are helped by medications. A surgical device may help people with severe symptoms, but it hasn't been tested long term.
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May 15, 2014 — Two new drugs for hepatitis C can save lives. They are also wildly expensive, costing $66,000 to $84,000 per person. Insurers face paying billions for treatment, or explicitly rationing vital care.
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