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September 2, 2014 | NPR · At a Labor Day picnic in Milwaukee, the president accused the GOP of blocking economic initiatives. He urged the sympathetic union audience to turn their frustration into political action in November.
 
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September 2, 2014 | NPR · The city's plan to restructure its debt has been praised as a creative way to protect both pensioners and its art museum. But some creditors — and residents — feel like they're being railroaded.
 
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September 2, 2014 | NPR · A company called WTAS is reviving the defunct accounting firm's name and hoping clients have forgotten its associations with the Enron scandal.
 

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September 1, 2014 | NPR · Ebola has exposed weaknesses in Africa's health networks and a failure to work together to arrest the spread of the virus. The "not our problem" response is taking an economic toll on the continent.
 
September 1, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 260 health workers in West Africa have been infected, and 134 have died. Dr. Robert Garry of Tulane University, who worked with five who died, discusses the devastation in the community.
 
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September 1, 2014 | NPR · Ads with candidates shooting guns are proliferating this year. It can all be traced back to Sen. Joe Manchin's famed 2010 spot "Dead Aim."
 

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August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

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August 31, 2014 | NPR · Immigration remains one of the most challenging issues for President Obama. Political correspondent Mara Liasson discusses the political cost of the choices before him with Linda Wertheimer.
 

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medical treatments

Jul 29, 2014 — We spend $15 billion a year training doctors but end up with a medical workforce that doesn't meet the nation's health care needs, according to an Institute of Medicine Report.
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Jul 21, 2014 — Over the past few decades, tuberculosis has evolved into dangerous forms that can't be killed by traditional antibiotics. But there's a new weapon in the pipeline to wipe out the deadly infection.
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Jul 21, 2014 — It's been tough to identify the problems that only turn up after medicines are on the market. An experimental project is now combing through data to get earlier, more accurate warnings.
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Jun 26, 2014 — Many people use products using benzoyl peroxide or salicylic acid to treat acne. The Food and Drug Administration says rare but dangerous allergic reactions have landed people in the hospital.
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Jun 11, 2014 — Pro athletes and duffers alike are trying injections of platelet-rich plasma to treat chronic injuries like tennis elbow. But despite thousands of studies, it's not clear that the treatment works.
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Jun 10, 2014 — More people are using insulin to control Type 2 diabetes, and most of those people are using newer analog forms. But patients pay more out of pocket for these drugs, a study finds.
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Jun 9, 2014 — Boys are more likely to be diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder than girls, though both sexes are equally affected. Women are increasingly seeking treatment as young adults.
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Jun 2, 2014 — Women with multiple sclerosis often find that they have fewer problems when they are expecting. That led researchers to develop an experimental drug based on a hormone associated with pregnancy.
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Jun 2, 2014 — Lots of people have heartburn or gastric reflux, and not all of them are helped by medications. A surgical device may help people with severe symptoms, but it hasn't been tested long term.
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May 15, 2014 — Two new drugs for hepatitis C can save lives. They are also wildly expensive, costing $66,000 to $84,000 per person. Insurers face paying billions for treatment, or explicitly rationing vital care.
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