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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The attorney general hugged community leaders, a highway patrol captain and the mother of Michael Brown during his visit, and got an update on the federal investigation into the teen's shooting.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · At McCluer High School, 30 varsity football players — all black, mostly from Ferguson — practice. David Greene talks to Sports Illustrated writer Robert Klemko about his story, "Football in Ferguson."
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · Kelly McEvers talks to Syria expert Shashank Joshi, about President Bashar al-Assad's tenacious grip on power. Joshi is with the Royal Services Institute in London.
 

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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The aftermath of the police shooting in Ferguson, Mo., has focused attention on police-involved killings more broadly in the U.S. But statistics on shootings by police are scarce. To learn why, Audie Cornish speaks with David Klinger, an associate professor at the University of Missouri in St. Louis.
 
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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The hunt is on to identify the man in the James Foley execution video who speaks with a British accent. An estimated 2,000 Europeans have left home to join the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · An Israeli airstrike killed three Hamas military commanders, who were buried shortly later amid threats that the militant group would respond.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Revolutionary Road Trip

Jul 5, 2012 — Most Libyans are under 25, and for these young people the revolution has created a new set of possibilities and challenges.
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Jun 19, 2012 — Mohammed Tolba is an iPad-toting Egyptian cafe habitue who advocates a purist brand of Islam. He seems to embody the complexities of a country going through a difficult transition.
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Jun 18, 2012 — An online news website, El Koshary Today, is sort of the Egyptian equivalent of The Onion. It's taking advantage of the country's freer atmosphere and isn't afraid to mock the absurdities of politics.
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Jun 15, 2012 — The pigeon paradox is that they are both reviled as urban pests and revered as a delicacy when stuffed or broiled in many nations. And the birds we eat are specially bred, not raised on garbage on the street.
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Jun 15, 2012 — A catchy, crazy little song for one sweet voice, accordion and recorder has enraptured a country — and more than one American listener.
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Jun 15, 2012 — Morning Edition's Steve Inskeep is on a journey from Carthage to Cairo. Here are two reading lists that will make his adventure a literary one.
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Jun 14, 2012 — The Revolutionary Road trip crew turns to The Salt for advice on whether some local Libyan honey could heal one member's upset stomach. The answer is probably not, but if it tastes good, we say, drink up.
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Jun 14, 2012 — More than a year after its revolution, Egypt is still struggling for direction. The country holds a runoff Saturday and Sunday in its first competitive presidential election, and the choices show the country's divide: One candidate is from the Islamist Muslim Brotherhood; the other, a former prime minister in Hosni Mubarak's regime.
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Jun 13, 2012 — A meal in a Tripoli restaurant prompts questions about how to cook camel and its history as a food. Camel meat has long been a staple in the Middle East, Pakistan, and North and East Africa, and it's catching on in some parts of the U.S.
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Jun 13, 2012 — Moammar Gadhafi suppressed everyone who posed a potential threat, including Islamists. Today, Islamists are vying with secular groups for supremacy in post-Gadhafi Libya. Derna, outside Benghazi in eastern Libya, is one of the battlefields.
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