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April 23, 2014 | NPR · They say they were placed on the list for refusing to inform on other Muslims. The suit is part of a broad wave of cases challenging the secretive no-fly list and U.S. counterterrorism strategies.
 
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April 23, 2014 | NPR · Activists say a federal law that allows employers to pay people with disabilities pennies per hour is out of date and should be changed. But some say the law is a lifeline for the disabled.
 
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April 23, 2014 | NPR · Shakespeare's Globe Theater aims to take the Bard's iconic play to every country in the world. It will perform everywhere from prestigious theaters to Pacific island beaches.
 

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April 21, 2014 | NPR · Last year a scientist said he'd found a new form of botulinum toxin, and was keeping details secret to keep the recipe from terrorists. But other science and public health labs were shut out, too.
 
April 23, 2014 | NPR · Pharmaceutical companies are suddenly trading entire divisions the way sports teams swap players. Glaxo, Novartis and Ely Lily are all involved in a complicated deal announced Tuesday, and so far this year, five deals exceeding $2 billion have been announced. What's driving the deal-making?
 
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April 23, 2014 | NPR · For decades, a mysterious quacking "bio-duck" has been heard roaming the waters of the Southern Ocean. Now scientists say the source is a whale.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · Monday is the 2014 Boston Marathon. Security will be tight, and this year's race will be an emotional event that will be about more than who wins.
 

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'Books That Changed the World'

Nov 28, 2007 — Francis Wheen, biographer of Karl Marx, argues that as long as capitalism endures, Marx's masterwork, Das Kapital, will be required reading. First published in 1867, Marx's influential critique laid the groundwork for thinkers and revolutionaries to follow.
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Nov 12, 2007 — The Bible is the most widely circulated book in history and one of the most influential texts of all time. Religious affairs expert Karen Armstrong weighs in on the uncertain origins and complex development of the Scriptures.
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Oct 23, 2007 — Author Christopher Hitchens discusses how philosopher Thomas Paine's writings influenced human rights and the French and American revolutions. He says Paine's accessible rhetoric was key to his widespread influence.
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Aug 23, 2007 — Oxford professor and author Hew Strachan talks about his book, Clausewitz's On War: A Biography. It's part of the Books that Changed the World series.
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Aug 8, 2007 — The dialogues of Plato's The Republic are regarded as the first great texts on political and moral theory. Philosopher Simon Blackburn has written a new book about The Republic, gently reminding those of us who have forgotten why it remains so important.
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Apr 3, 2007 — Janet Browne talks about the life of Charles Darwin. Her new book, Darwin's Origin of Species, takes a look at the English naturalist and his theory of evolution. The biography is the latest in a series called "Books that Changed the World."
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Mar 7, 2007 — In the second of a series on "Books That Changed the World," professor Bruce Lawrence discusses his new biography of the Koran, where he introduces readers to the text, its historical context and the individuals who played critical roles in the evolution of Islam.
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Jan 8, 2007 — Author and journalist P.J. O'Rourke delves into the content and influence of Adam Smith's classic, The Wealth of Nations. He talks about digesting the massive tome on economics, so you don't have to.
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