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August 28, 2014 | NPR · For the first time, researchers have tracked the spread of Ebola, almost in real time, during an outbreak. The virus is quickly changing its genetic code. But it's unclear what the mutations mean.
 
August 29, 2014 | NPR · French President Francois Hollande is under pressure to fix the country's economy, which is overburdened by regulation and failing a generation of young people. He's also facing calls for austerity.
 
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August 29, 2014 | NPR · Congressman and former Republican vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan discusses his new book, The Way Forward: Renewing the American Idea.
 

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August 30, 2014 | NPR · In Ukraine, worried officials in the southeastern part of the country beefed up their defenses on Saturday as rebel forces slowly moved west following the recent capture of a strategic seaside town.
 
August 30, 2014 | NPR · Arun Rath talks to former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Steven Pifer about NATO and EU options for confronting Russian aggression in Ukraine.
 
August 30, 2014 | NPR · More than 500 people may have traveled from the U.K. to Syria to fight in its civil war. Arun Rath talks to Jessica Stern, author of Terror In The Name Of God, about how it's drawing Westerners.
 

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August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

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August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

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Morning Edition for July 5, 2012

Jul 5, 2012 — A Department of Veterans Affairs hospital in Milwaukee has begun recruiting for additional mental health providers. It's part of a nationwide effort to bring on about 1,600 new psychiatrists, psychologists and social workers to reduce wait times for treatment.
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Jul 5, 2012 — Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney spent his July Fourth holiday marching in a New Hampshire parade. He also backtracked on a top adviser's statement calling the individual mandate in the Obama health care law a fee or a fine. Romney says the Supreme Court ruled that it's a tax.
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Jul 5, 2012 — When the officials at a Florida prison realized who Al Black was, they gave him a paintbrush and the walls as a canvas.
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Jul 5, 2012 — A New Orleans socialite donated space in her family's mausoleum in the city's famous St. Louis Cemetery No. 2. Now, the final resting place of a white, aristocratic family is also the eternal home of black musical royalty: Ernie "Emperor of the Universe" K-Doe and Earl King.
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Jul 5, 2012 — Most Libyans are under 25, and for these young people the revolution has created a new set of possibilities and challenges.
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Jul 5, 2012 — New Orleans now has the highest per capita murder rate in the country. The killings are concentrated in the city's poorest neighborhoods — places like Central City, just a few blocks north of the stately mansions that line St. Charles Avenue.
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Jul 5, 2012 — Washington, D.C., in the 1830s was a city of ferment. Free blacks were moving in, eventually outnumbering the city's slaves — a development that made whites very nervous. Those tensions came to a head in the now-forgotten race riot of 1835, an episode detailed in author Jefferson Morley's new book.
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Jul 5, 2012 — A small, out-of-the-way Michigan town is celebrating its unique place in America's civil rights history. From 1912 until the Civil Rights Act passed in 1964, Idlewild was the summer refuge of choice for thousands of black Americans looking to escape the shadow of Jim Crow in the woods of northern Michigan.
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Jul 5, 2012 — Even as it upheld most of the health care law last week, the Supreme Court limited federal power under the Constitution's Commerce Clause. Seventy years ago, an Ohio farmer sought to do the same — and lost.
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more Morning Edition for July 5, 2012 from NPR