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August 1, 2014 | NPR · Renee Montagne talks with the head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr. Thomas Frieden, for the latest news about the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · CIA director John Brennan apologized to Sen. Dianne Feinstein, who had accused the CIA of spying on her committee's computers. Brennan at first denied it.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · It's one of the most popular items, but often it seems to be as far as humanly possible from the entrance. The Planet Money team looks at two very different theories about why that is.
 

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July 31, 2014 | NPR · The day began with Israel's military calling up 16,000 more reservists, stoking fears of a widening offensive in Gaza; it ended with a 72-hour cease-fire agreement between Israel and Hamas.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Nearly a month into the war in Gaza, pollsters have been taking a look at how attitudes in the region have changed among Israelis and Palestinians.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · A surge of new cases in West Africa's Ebola virus outbreak has health officials worried that the epidemic is getting worse. Sierra Leone, for one, has declared a state of emergency, sending in troops to quarantine some of the hardest hit communities.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Morning Edition for July 10, 2012

Jul 10, 2012 — An investigation by NPR and the Center for Public Integrity has revealed widespread and persistent gaming of the system that's designed to measure and control the coal mine dust that causes the deadly disease.
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Jul 10, 2012 — African-Americans suffer some of the highest rates of HIV and AIDS in the country. The NAACP says it's time for one of the most important institutions in the black community, the church, to help combat those numbers. The NAACP has released a manual especially designed for clergy to assist in discussions about HIV-AIDS as a social justice issue with their parishioners.
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Jul 10, 2012 — In St. Augustine, Fla., a historic cemetery is best known for a famous priest who's no longer buried there. The Tolomato Cemetery also reflects the city's long history, from Spanish rule to more recent times.
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Jul 10, 2012 — For a growing number of U.S. college students and young adults, the idea of building an American dream is to think internationally. They are a group that pollster John Zogby is now calling "the first globals."
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Jul 10, 2012 — For Robin D.G. Kelley, Blades' 1984 song "Buscando America" echoes his mother's experience of coming to this country, and exposes the painful struggle that is the cost of fulfilling the American dream.
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Jul 10, 2012 — Fifteen years ago, Egypt's Hosni Mubarak embarked on a grand project to cultivate farmland in the desert and create new towns. But massive projects like Toshka in southern Egypt have languished due to mismanagement, corruption and Mubarak's ouster.
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Jul 10, 2012 — Alan Cumming stars in a creative reinterpretation of Shakespeare's Scottish play Macbeth. Cumming stars as Fred, a mental patient who performs his own highly personal version of the classic tragedy, playing nearly every character.
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Jul 10, 2012 — Every four years, organizers of the Olympic Games promise that expensive facilities will be put to good use after the crowds depart. But saddled with high maintenance costs, Beijing's Olympic venues, such as the Bird's Nest stadium, are struggling to find an afterlife.
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Jul 10, 2012 — Today's manufacturing work requires a strong grasp of fractions, decimals and basic trigonometry — skills that many job applicants often lack. So colleges and nonprofits are stepping in to fill the skills gap with programs that combine manufacturing training with basic math and reading.
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more Morning Edition for July 10, 2012 from NPR