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August 28, 2014 | NPR · For the first time, researchers have tracked the spread of Ebola, almost in real time, during an outbreak. The virus is quickly changing its genetic code. But it's unclear what the mutations mean.
 
August 29, 2014 | NPR · French President Francois Hollande is under pressure to fix the country's economy, which is overburdened by regulation and failing a generation of young people. He's also facing calls for austerity.
 
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August 29, 2014 | NPR · Congressman and former Republican vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan discusses his new book, The Way Forward: Renewing the American Idea.
 

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August 30, 2014 | NPR · In Ukraine, worried officials in the southeastern part of the country beefed up their defenses on Saturday as rebel forces slowly moved west following the recent capture of a strategic seaside town.
 
August 30, 2014 | NPR · Arun Rath talks to former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Steven Pifer about NATO and EU options for confronting Russian aggression in Ukraine.
 
August 30, 2014 | NPR · More than 500 people may have traveled from the U.K. to Syria to fight in its civil war. Arun Rath talks to Jessica Stern, author of Terror In The Name Of God, about how it's drawing Westerners.
 

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August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

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August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

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All Things Considered for July 19, 2012

Jul 19, 2012 — The practice of hyphenating last names upon marriage was particularly popular in the 1980s and '90s. Now that the "hyphen generation" is marrying and parenting, many couples are struggling with which names to keep, and which to pass down to to their children.
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Jul 19, 2012 — Former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty is the son of a truck driver, an evangelical Christian, a former presidential candidate, and for months now a loyal surrogate for Republican Mitt Romney. He's also considered a top contender to become Romney's pick for vice president.
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Jul 19, 2012 — Saxophonist and composer Ravi Coltrane — son of John and Alice — says his mother's love of symphonic music provided a childhood soundtrack for him and his siblings.
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Jul 19, 2012 — A part of the brain called the premotor cortex does some pretty complicated work. It's where the brain plans and strategizes about how to take action, and it may also reflect a person's personality.
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Jul 19, 2012 — Journalist Bill Wasik and his veterinarian wife, Monica Murphy, have teamed up for a new book on the cultural and scientific history of rabies. Rabies causes terrible suffering — but it's fascinating to examine the way the virus is perfectly engineered to spread itself.
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Jul 19, 2012 — Greek yogurt sales are booming in the U.S., and some companies are turning to new technology to get in on it. But some Greek yogurt purists who compete with those companies for market share say the products are not the same.
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Jul 19, 2012 — A missing link in the history of women's underwear has been revealed by the University of Innsbruck in the U.K. They are four linen bras dating back to the Middle Ages and change the answer to that nagging question, "Which came first, the corset or the bra?" Hilary Davidson, fashion curator for the London Museum, explains the importance of the find.
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Jul 19, 2012 — A private school in Pennsylvania is denying admission to an HIV positive student. The residential Milton Hershey School says the student would put other children at risk. Now there's a lawsuit against the school and a campaign to boycott Hershey products. The candy company largely bankrolls the school for disadvantaged youth.
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Jul 19, 2012 — Content in the free online encyclopedia Wikipedia can be generated and edited by anyone. But the power to delete or lock those entries lies in the hands of the site's "administrators." A rigorous screening process for new administrators has partly led to a drop in site participation. Now, Wikipedia is struggling to find new editors.
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Jul 19, 2012 — China and Russia vetoed a U.N. resolution threatening sanctions against Syria unless it stops targeting and attacking civilians.
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more All Things Considered for July 19, 2012 from NPR