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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The attorney general hugged community leaders, a highway patrol captain and the mother of Michael Brown during his visit, and got an update on the federal investigation into the teen's shooting.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · At McCluer High School, 30 varsity football players — all black, mostly from Ferguson — practice. David Greene talks to Sports Illustrated writer Robert Klemko about his story, "Football in Ferguson."
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · Kelly McEvers talks to Syria expert Shashank Joshi, about President Bashar al-Assad's tenacious grip on power. Joshi is with the Royal Services Institute in London.
 

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August 21, 2014 | KWMU · The violence at night in Ferguson, Mo., has calmed down for now. However, there have been more than 160 people arrested since the protests began. Police records offer a sense of who they are.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · The aftermath of the police shooting in Ferguson, Mo., has focused attention on police-involved killings more broadly in the U.S. But statistics on shootings by police are scarce. To learn why, Audie Cornish speaks with David Klinger, an associate professor at the University of Missouri in St. Louis.
 
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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The hunt is on to identify the man in the James Foley execution video who speaks with a British accent. An estimated 2,000 Europeans have left home to join the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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All Things Considered for July 19, 2012

Jul 19, 2012 — The practice of hyphenating last names upon marriage was particularly popular in the 1980s and '90s. Now that the "hyphen generation" is marrying and parenting, many couples are struggling with which names to keep, and which to pass down to to their children.
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Jul 19, 2012 — Former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty is the son of a truck driver, an evangelical Christian, a former presidential candidate, and for months now a loyal surrogate for Republican Mitt Romney. He's also considered a top contender to become Romney's pick for vice president.
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Jul 19, 2012 — Saxophonist and composer Ravi Coltrane — son of John and Alice — says his mother's love of symphonic music provided a childhood soundtrack for him and his siblings.
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Jul 19, 2012 — A part of the brain called the premotor cortex does some pretty complicated work. It's where the brain plans and strategizes about how to take action, and it may also reflect a person's personality.
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Jul 19, 2012 — Journalist Bill Wasik and his veterinarian wife, Monica Murphy, have teamed up for a new book on the cultural and scientific history of rabies. Rabies causes terrible suffering — but it's fascinating to examine the way the virus is perfectly engineered to spread itself.
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Jul 19, 2012 — Greek yogurt sales are booming in the U.S., and some companies are turning to new technology to get in on it. But some Greek yogurt purists who compete with those companies for market share say the products are not the same.
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Jul 19, 2012 — A missing link in the history of women's underwear has been revealed by the University of Innsbruck in the U.K. They are four linen bras dating back to the Middle Ages and change the answer to that nagging question, "Which came first, the corset or the bra?" Hilary Davidson, fashion curator for the London Museum, explains the importance of the find.
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Jul 19, 2012 — A private school in Pennsylvania is denying admission to an HIV positive student. The residential Milton Hershey School says the student would put other children at risk. Now there's a lawsuit against the school and a campaign to boycott Hershey products. The candy company largely bankrolls the school for disadvantaged youth.
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Jul 19, 2012 — Content in the free online encyclopedia Wikipedia can be generated and edited by anyone. But the power to delete or lock those entries lies in the hands of the site's "administrators." A rigorous screening process for new administrators has partly led to a drop in site participation. Now, Wikipedia is struggling to find new editors.
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Jul 19, 2012 — China and Russia vetoed a U.N. resolution threatening sanctions against Syria unless it stops targeting and attacking civilians.
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more All Things Considered for July 19, 2012 from NPR