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July 31, 2014 | NPR · Tens of thousands of displaced Gazans face skyrocketing prices for limited water supplies, and severely disrupted electricity service. As well, long lines are developing for staples like bread.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Christian Science Monitor reporter Christa Case Bryant tells Renee Montagne why the Israeli army is finding Hamas a more formidable foe now than during the 2009 war.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Oklahoma is experiencing more earthquakes, and some scientists say they're caused by wastewater disposal wells. Linda Wertheimer learns more from energy reporter Joe Wertz of StateImpact Oklahoma.
 

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July 31, 2014 | NPR · The day began with Israel's military calling up 16,000 more reservists, stoking fears of a widening offensive in Gaza; it ended with a 72-hour cease-fire agreement between Israel and Hamas.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Nearly a month into the war in Gaza, pollsters have been taking a look at how attitudes in the region have changed among Israelis and Palestinians.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · A surge of new cases in West Africa's Ebola virus outbreak has health officials worried that the epidemic is getting worse. Sierra Leone, for one, has declared a state of emergency, sending in troops to quarantine some of the hardest hit communities.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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sanitation

Jul 31, 2014 — A group of environmentalists in Vermont aren't at all squeamish about "pee-cycling." A local hay farmer is using their pee as fertilizer as they run tests to find out how safe it is for growing food.
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Jul 26, 2014 — Dionna Fry spent last summer in Ethiopia, finding out how the locals liked a new kind of latrine that reduces the risk of disease — and can turn waste into fertilizer for a fruit tree.
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May 17, 2014 — Improving access to clean water can reduce the spread of diarrheal diseases in developing countries. The "Drinkable Book" should help: It has water safety tips and each page works as a filter.
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Mar 21, 2014 — The deadly bacteria continue to sicken and kill people in Haiti. And the epidemic won't stop until the country provides basic sanitation. Many Haitians still don't even have latrines.
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Jul 10, 2013 — Many families in rural Tajikistan spend hours each day collecting water from communal spigots or nearby rivers, where the water often isn't safe. When one village gets a new water system — and a tap in each yard — residents have more time to grow food and earn money to support their families.
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Mar 22, 2013 — Six billion people around the world now own cellphones, while only 4.5 billion people have a safe place to use the bathroom, the United Nations said Thursday. Improving sanitation could help prevent thousands of kids from dying each day of waterborne diseases.
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Aug 15, 2012 — During a festival this week at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, scientists from around the world showcased the latest toilet technologies. Bill Gates himself awarded top-performing commodes, including a solar-powered toilet and one that dehydrates waste within 24 hours.
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Aug 10, 2012 — The Gates Foundation has granted engineers more than $3 million to develop cheap, high-tech toilets that don't need water or electricity. To test these supercommodes, the foundation has purchased 50 pounds of soybean paste that resembles human waste.
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more sanitation from NPR