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August 22, 2014 | NPR · The standoff between the U.S. and Russia over Ukraine has raised the specter of a new Cold War. David Greene talks to Julie Ioffe, of the New Republic, about what Russia's next move may be in Ukraine.
 
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August 22, 2014 | NPR · Even just the word Ebola is kind of terrifying. Why? Hollywood has a lot to do with it. But Ebola outbreaks also have all the ingredients for what one psychologist calls the "dread factor."
 
August 22, 2014 | NPR · Census Bureau data show a wider gap between rich and poor. Kelly McEvers explores this with economist Enrico Moretti of the University of California-Berkeley, author of The New Geography of Jobs.
 

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August 21, 2014 | KWMU · The violence at night in Ferguson, Mo., has calmed down for now. However, more than 160 people have been arrested since the protests began. Police records offer a sense of who they are.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · The aftermath of the police shooting in Ferguson, Mo., has focused attention on police-involved killings more broadly in the U.S. But statistics on shootings by police are scarce. To learn why, Audie Cornish speaks with David Klinger, an associate professor at the University of Missouri in St. Louis.
 
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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The hunt is on to identify the man in the James Foley execution video who speaks with a British accent. An estimated 2,000 Europeans have left home to join the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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genome

Mar 11, 2014 — Wouldn't it be great to be able to scan your genes and find out your disease risk? Those scanners exist. But a test of their usefulness for medical care found them not as accurate as one would hope.
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Nov 25, 2013 — People's genes can affect how they'll respond to blood thinners and cancer drugs. But inaccurate results can lead to bad medical decisions. Regulators are pushing back against a company that has been among the most aggressive in marketing personal genetic testing directly to consumers.
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Oct 5, 2012 — Scientists have been using whole genome sequencing for over a decade, but it has yet to become a routine tool in the clinic. Two separate research groups showed progress in making diagnoses using in-depth genome analysis.
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Oct 2, 2012 — The prospect of lots of people plunging into their genomes makes many doctors very nervous. Some argue that for most people, genome sequencing could reveal false positives and be a big waste of time and money.
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Sep 25, 2012 — Doctors used genome sequencing to put a name to the mysterious cluster of symptoms that afflicted Christian Terry, 5. He's one of many patients now getting the test, which can cost as little as $1,000, to resolve undiagnosed illnesses. Doctors are also using it to sequence cancer and target treatment at the precise genetic mutations in a tumor.
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Sep 19, 2012 — Prominent geneticists are getting their own genomes decoded, revealing the benefits and risks.
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Sep 18, 2012 — The cost of deciphering a person's genetic code has dropped faster than the price of flat-screen TVs. But some experts are concerned that access to genomic information could stoke fears and invade privacy.
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Sep 5, 2012 — For decades, scientists thought that most of our genetic code was essentially useless filler between our genes. But the results of a massive project to understand this so-called junk DNA reveal that it contains switches that control how genes function.
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more genome from NPR