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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Schoolgirls were kidnapped in Nigeria Tuesday. The suspects are believed to be with a radical group blamed for a bombing Monday. Kelly McEvers talks to Michelle Faul of The Associated Press.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Fans and foes want to know whether the Affordable Care Act is meeting its goals. But, for good reasons, there are no clear answers yet.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A year after the Boston Marathon bombing, Heather Abbott has adapted to life with her prostheses, including a blade for running and one that allows her to wear her favorite shoes.
 

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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian tanks arrived in the city of Kramatorsk Wednesday morning. By the time they rolled out of the city, they were flying Russian flags. People in Kramatorsk tell the story of what happened.
 
April 16, 2014 | NPR · NATO has announced a strengthening of its forces near the alliance's eastern border. Gen. George Joulwan, the former NATO supreme allied commander for Europe, discusses the plan.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A 325 million-year-old fossil find shows that the gill structures of modern sharks are actually quite different from their ancient ancestors.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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genome

Mar 11, 2014 — Wouldn't it be great to be able to scan your genes and find out your disease risk? Those scanners exist. But a test of their usefulness for medical care found them not as accurate as one would hope.
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Nov 25, 2013 — People's genes can affect how they'll respond to blood thinners and cancer drugs. But inaccurate results can lead to bad medical decisions. Regulators are pushing back against a company that has been among the most aggressive in marketing personal genetic testing directly to consumers.
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Oct 5, 2012 — Scientists have been using whole genome sequencing for over a decade, but it has yet to become a routine tool in the clinic. Two separate research groups showed progress in making diagnoses using in-depth genome analysis.
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Oct 2, 2012 — The prospect of lots of people plunging into their genomes makes many doctors very nervous. Some argue that for most people, genome sequencing could reveal false positives and be a big waste of time and money.
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Sep 25, 2012 — Doctors used genome sequencing to put a name to the mysterious cluster of symptoms that afflicted Christian Terry, 5. He's one of many patients now getting the test, which can cost as little as $1,000, to resolve undiagnosed illnesses. Doctors are also using it to sequence cancer and target treatment at the precise genetic mutations in a tumor.
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Sep 19, 2012 — Prominent geneticists are getting their own genomes decoded, revealing the benefits and risks.
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Sep 18, 2012 — The cost of deciphering a person's genetic code has dropped faster than the price of flat-screen TVs. But some experts are concerned that access to genomic information could stoke fears and invade privacy.
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Sep 5, 2012 — For decades, scientists thought that most of our genetic code was essentially useless filler between our genes. But the results of a massive project to understand this so-called junk DNA reveal that it contains switches that control how genes function.
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more genome from NPR