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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Schoolgirls were kidnapped in Nigeria Tuesday. The suspects are believed to be with a radical group blamed for a bombing Monday. Kelly McEvers talks to Michelle Faul of The Associated Press.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Fans and foes want to know whether the Affordable Care Act is meeting its goals. But, for good reasons, there are no clear answers yet.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A year after the Boston Marathon bombing, Heather Abbott has adapted to life with her prostheses, including a blade for running and one that allows her to wear her favorite shoes.
 

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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian tanks arrived in the city of Kramatorsk Wednesday morning. By the time they rolled out of the city, they were flying Russian flags. People in Kramatorsk tell the story of what happened.
 
April 16, 2014 | NPR · NATO has announced a strengthening of its forces near the alliance's eastern border. Gen. George Joulwan, the former NATO supreme allied commander for Europe, discusses the plan.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A 325-million-year-old fossil find shows that the gill structures of modern sharks are actually quite different from their ancient ancestors.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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anthropology

Apr 10, 2014 — A Dutch organization called Mars One plans to establish a human colony on Mars by 2025. Anthropologist Barbara J. King wonders what it takes to leave your loved ones behind for the Red Planet.
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Mar 21, 2014 — When girls act differently from boys, both biological and cultural factors may be at work. But which is primary, and can research on chimpanzees shed light on the answer?
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Mar 18, 2014 — An analysis of DNA from ancient and modern chicken bones from the Pacific islands shows they are genetically distinct from South American birds.
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Feb 13, 2014 — Ancient footprints discovered in Britain show that five individuals of mixed ages took a stroll together 800,000 years ago. Commentator Barbara J. King asks whether it's scientifically credible to consider these individuals a family.
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Oct 3, 2013 — Recently the media had a field day with reports of a "sexist" male gorilla in Dallas named Patrick. Anthropologist Barbara King reflects on whether terms like "sexism" and "rape" are used justifiably when describing our evolutionary cousins the apes.
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Sep 12, 2013 — Revered naturalist and filmmaker Sir David Attenborough recently startled scientists by declaring that humans are no longer evolving. Commentator and anthropologist Barbara J. King offers a clear response: Attenborough is wrong.
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Sep 5, 2013 — A new study that relies on brain-imaging of cerebral blood flows suggests that human speech and complex tool-making skills emerged together almost two million years ago. Commentator Barbara J. King digs through the evidence and offers her own take on this age-old question.
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Jun 13, 2013 — Recent anthropological research raises questions about whether our sedentary lifestyle contributes significantly to the obesity epidemic. Commentator Barbara J. King looks at the data and has thoughts on what it means for the Paleo diet.
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May 2, 2013 — Like many parents around the world, some moms and dads in Brooklyn are choosing to raise their children without using any diapers. How does this work and does it make any sense? Commentator Barbara J. King checks in with anthropologist Meredith Small, who embraces the idea with enthusiasm.
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Apr 1, 2013 — Anthropologists find that the use of "emotional" words in all sorts of books has soared and dipped across the past century, roughly mirroring each era's social and economic upheavals. And psychologists say this new form of language analysis may offer a more objective view into our culture.
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