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April 18, 2014 | NPR · The agreement calls on all parties to refrain from violence, requires that illegally-armed groups disarm and that control of government buildings be returned to Ukrainian authorities.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · President Obama said enrollment under the Affordable Care Act reached 8 million after the deadline was extended by 2 weeks. The figure represents a turnaround from the disastrous debut of the website.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Morning Edition spent a lot of time recently reporting from the U.S.-Mexico border. President Obama has deported 2 million people from the U.S. But many say that number is misleading.
 

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April 18, 2014 | NPR · It looks as though the "comment period" for the controversial Keystone XL pipeline project will be extended, delaying a decision past the November elections.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the breakthrough Ukraine deal and the new health care enrollment numbers.
 
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April 18, 2014 | NPR · Ivan Soltesz studies epilepsy in mice, but says children with chronic seizures are his inspiration. He's closing in on a way to quell the seizures with light — and without drugs' side effects.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Malala Yousufzai

Nov 7, 2013 — Mullah Fazlullah is said to have ordered the attack on Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani teenager who campaigned for girls' education. Inside Pakistan, Fazlullah rose to prominence several years ago through his fiery religious radio broadcasts, which earned him the nickname "Radio Mullah."
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Oct 10, 2013 — The 16-year-old from Pakistan, who was shot by Taliban militants for advocating education for girls, is considered a contender for this year's Nobel Peace Prize.
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Oct 10, 2013 — Also: Libya's prime minister is briefly abducted, then set free and 16-year-old Malala Yousafzai is awarded the Sakharov Prize.
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Oct 7, 2013 — In her first in-depth interviews since the Taliban shot her a year ago, Malala expressed no rancor. Instead, she recommitted to fighting for the education of girls.
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Oct 7, 2013 — Malala Yousafzai, who was shot in the head a year ago after campaigning for girls' education, has said the way forward is to talk to the Taliban.
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Sep 4, 2013 — Also: Lemony Snicket on poetry and playground slides; tiny secret paintings on the sides of books; Lorin Stein on John Hollander.
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Mar 19, 2013 — Malala described her return to school as her "happiest moment." After her shooting, Malala became a global hero and was nominated for the the Nobel Peace prize.
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Feb 4, 2013 — Malala Yousafzai was shot by the Taliban in Pakistan last October because she had been speaking out about its attempts to block Pakistani girls from going to school. Now the teenager is in England, where she continues to recover from her injuries. Her "Malala Fund" aims to help girls get educated.
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Jan 4, 2013 — Three months after being shot in the head because she had been speaking out against efforts to bar girls from going to school, the Pakistani girl is well enough to leave the U.K. hospital where she's been treated. She still faces more surgery, however.
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Jan 2, 2013 — The Pakistani teenager was shot by a Taliban gunman because she criticized efforts to stop her and other girls from going to school. Taken to the U.K. for treatment, she'll stay there now that her father has been given a diplomatic job.
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