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August 22, 2014 | NPR · The standoff between the U.S. and Russia over Ukraine has raised the specter of a new Cold War. David Greene talks to Julie Ioffe, of the New Republic, about what Russia's next move may be in Ukraine.
 
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August 22, 2014 | NPR · Even just the word Ebola is kind of terrifying. Why? Hollywood has a lot to do with it. But Ebola outbreaks also have all the ingredients for what one psychologist calls the "dread factor."
 
August 22, 2014 | NPR · Census Bureau data show a wider gap between rich and poor. Kelly McEvers explores this with economist Enrico Moretti of the University of California-Berkeley, author of The New Geography of Jobs.
 

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August 22, 2014 | NPR · It's been another rough August for President Obama. He's wrapping up a summer vacation marred by events in Ferguson, Mo., and the murder of an American journalist in the Middle East.
 
August 22, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Reihan Salam of The National Review, discuss the killing of American journalist James Foley and the ongoing conflict in Ferguson, Mo.
 
August 22, 2014 | NPR · The scent of fresh pencils is in the air, and homework assignments are around the corner. In honor of back-to-school season, author Alexander Aciman recommends The Lost Estate by Henri Alain-Fournier.
 

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August 23, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 1,500 people have died in the Ebola outbreak, and more nations in the region are closing their borders. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about the epidemic.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Weekend Edition Saturday for October 13, 2012

Oct 13, 2012 — Paddy Roy Bates,the self-proclaimed prince of Sealand, died this week at the age of 91. In 1965, Bates boarded an artillery platform seven miles off the English coast and set up Radio Essex, a "pirate" music station. But he didn't stop there.
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Oct 13, 2012 — A reporter's quest to understand differences in regional recipes of the Middle East staple yields homespun stories about their provenance.
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Oct 13, 2012 — The right to choose the school you want your child to attend has been the subject of court battles and bitter political debates. Still, both President Obama and Mitt Romney have made school choice a cornerstone of their efforts to reform public education.
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Oct 12, 2012 — Why is insurance employer-based? What kind of health care options would young women face under a President Romney? NPR's health policy correspondent breaks down the issues you want to know about leading up to the election.
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Oct 12, 2012 — NPR's longest-serving reference librarian, Kee Malesky, is the author of a new book, Learn Something New Every Day: 365 Facts to Fulfill Your Life. Malesky offers facts for each day of the year, from the landing on the moon to the invention of sliced bread.
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Oct 12, 2012 — Spain's dismal economy has residents of the country's richest region, Catalonia, wondering if they'd be better off going it alone. With their own language and distinct culture, Catalans have long pushed for independence from Spain.
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Oct 12, 2012 — Just five months after his election, Francois Hollande is facing protests from people who voted for him. His popularity has plummeted and his once-lauded "steady approach" is now perceived as dithering.
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Oct 11, 2012 — Five years ago, Peru spent $200 million on 800,000 low-cost laptops that it distributed to children throughout the nation. It was part of an effort reaching around the globe to help pull people out of poverty through computer use. The results in Peru have been less than resounding.
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more Weekend Edition Saturday for October 13, 2012 from NPR