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July 29, 2014 | NPR · House and Senate negotiators reached a compromise, $17 billion agreement to improve medical care for veterans. The deal comes in the final week before Congress leaves town for a monthlong recess.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Washington Post reporter Liz Sly tells Renee Montagne that U.S. arms may be flowing to moderate Syrian rebels, but the aid seems to be too little too late to affect the course of the civil war.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · The militant group threatens to kill parents who immunize their children. As a result, polio has come roaring back in Pakistan. Eradication now hinges on whether the country can control the virus.
 

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July 29, 2014 | KERA · After caring for Ebola patients for several months in West Africa, Dr. Kent Brantly noticed last week that he had symptoms. The 33-year-old immediately put himself into a Liberian isolation ward.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Virologist Thomas Geisbert has spent decades studying Ebola and other hemorrhagic fevers. He speaks to Audie Cornish about the current Ebola outbreak, the worst in history, and how it might be contained this time around.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · The Eid festival, which celebrates the end of Ramadan, serves as a time for visiting relatives and exchanging gifts. But one family's holiday in Gaza traces the death and displacement wrought by the war between Hamas and Israel.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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injuries

Jan 21, 2014 — These cousins of the shark send thousands of waders and surfers yelping for medical help each year. A powerful toxin in the barb of the ray's tail triggers a "knifelike pain" that can last for hours. Best prevention? Do the "stingray shuffle."
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Jan 9, 2014 — Hot air balloon tours are popular with tourists and people looking for the thrill of a lifetime. But accidents can cause injuries and death, a study finds. Leg and ankle fractures were among the most common serious injuries. Most of the problems happen when balloons land badly.
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Jul 22, 2013 — Breathing in, not out, has landed several homemade blowgun enthusiasts in the emergency room, a study says. They recovered with no lasting harm. But the report says doctors should be aware of the risks posed by Internet instructions for DIY blowguns.
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Jul 22, 2013 — Every 30 minutes a child ends up in the emergency room after being injured by a television. Flat screen TVs aren't necessarily safer, according to a study. They are heavy and perhaps even more likely to tip over than those old tube monsters. Experts say TVs need to be tethered to a wall.
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Jul 5, 2013 — Five people burst into flames last year after spray-on sunscreen ignited on their skin. The manufacturer has recalled those sprays, but the Food and Drug Administration says sprays can still pose a fire risk because they include flammable chemicals. So spray carefully, or opt for a shirt.
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Jun 20, 2013 — Making low-power bombs with household chemicals like toilet bowl cleaner may seem like harmless summer fun. Not so, says the CDC. The bombs can cause burns and lung injuries, not to mention a visit from the local hazardous materials squad. Leave the bomb-making to TV hero MacGyver.
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Mar 28, 2013 — Manufacturers of water heaters agreed in 1988 to set all heaters at 120 degrees Fahrenheit to help reduce tap water burns. But burn rates haven't declined much, so a scientist wanted to find out why.
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Mar 7, 2013 — Commercial fishermen have the highest rate of on-the-job fatalities of any occupation in the country. The winches that shrimpers use to pull in their nets pose particular hazards, an analysis of deaths and injuries finds.
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Feb 1, 2013 — Football may be dangerous. But the Super Bowl is a spectacle of beauty. It is an opportunity for us to adore the magnificent achievement of courageous men. That's why philosopher Alva NoŽ will be watching.
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Nov 26, 2012 — The wildly popular mosh pits for the school-age set have become a common source of injuries that send kids to the hospital. Doctors call for safer designs for inflatable bouncers and better guidelines for their use.
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