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July 25, 2014 | NPR · Steve Inskeep talks with Honduran Foreign Minister Mireya Aguero de Corrales, who's in Washington to help find a solution to the thousands of Central American children arriving at the U.S. border.
 
July 25, 2014 | WBUR · Massachusetts is offering to house hundreds of unaccompanied minors who've been detained crossing the U.S.-Mexico border. One of the proposed sites is on Cape Cod, but residents are blasting the plan.
 
July 25, 2014 | NPR · The novels of John le Carre have been reliable sources of compelling cinema. The new adaptation of "A Most Wanted Man" stars Philip Seymour Hoffman in one of his last roles.
 

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July 25, 2014 | NPR · Central American presidents met with President Obama, discussing the influx of unaccompanied children crossing the border. So far, Obama has not seen eye to eye with Congress on possible solutions.
 
July 25, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss U.S. policy options in the Gaza Strip and Rep. Paul Ryan's anti-poverty plan.
 
July 25, 2014 | NPR · Sayed Kashua is an Arab who writes novels in Hebrew and a sitcom in Arabic. A contradiction? Maybe. But his newest book is a good look at an often-overlooked segment of the Israeli population.
 

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July 19, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Scott Simon talks with David Herzsenhorn of The New York Times about the latest developments in Ukraine, where a Malaysia Airlines passenger plane was downed on Thursday, killing 298 people.
 

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July 20, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Arun Rath gets the latest from correspondent Corey Flintoff at the site of last week's downing of a Malaysian jetliner in Eastern Ukraine.
 

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Hallucinations

Jul 15, 2013 — At No. 12, Oliver Sacks investigates the types, sources and cultural resonance of Hallucinations.
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Jul 1, 2013 — In softcover nonfiction, David Crist looks at America's conflict with Iran and Oliver Sacks investigates hallucinations. In fiction, Ian McEwan delivers a Cold War thriller, Tom Wolfe explores racial and ethnic conflict in Miami and Emma Straub tracks a small town girl's rise to Hollywood stardom.
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Jun 21, 2013 — The famed neurologist talks to Fresh Air about how grief, trauma, brain injury, medications and neurological disorders can trigger hallucinations — and about his personal experimentation with hallucinogenic drugs in the 1960s.
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Apr 27, 2013 — Sacks turns 80 this year. Philosopher Alva NoŽ asks the question: What makes Sacks' work so important?
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Nov 16, 2012Hallucinations, Oliver Sacks' investigation of mirages and altered states, debuts at No. 5.
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Nov 13, 2012 — The world's first essayist, Michel Montaigne, was out riding one day when he got slammed from the rear, was thrown from his horse, crashed to the ground and for a brief time was, as he puts it, "dead." He described exactly what it felt like. Here's what he learned.
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Nov 7, 2012 — You're born, live and die with one body. One is all you get. But some people, says neurologist Oliver Sacks, occasionally get another one; it's an illusion, a hallucination, but it follows you around, copying everything you do. It looks like it's keeping you company. But it's not.
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Nov 6, 2012 — The famed neurologist talks to Fresh Air about how grief, trauma, brain injury, medications and neurological disorders can trigger hallucinations — and about his personal experimentation with hallucinogenic drugs in the 1960s.
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Oct 24, 2012 — Neurologist Oliver Sacks' new book is a thoughtful look at hallucinations — visual and otherwise. In this exclusive excerpt, we learn about auditory hallucinations — and that not everyone who hears voices is necessarily mentally ill.
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more Hallucinations from NPR