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August 28, 2014 | NPR · For the first time, researchers have tracked the spread of Ebola, almost in real time, during an outbreak. The virus is quickly changing its genetic code. But it's unclear what the mutations mean.
 
August 29, 2014 | NPR · French President Francois Hollande is under pressure to fix the country's economy, which is overburdened by regulation and failing a generation of young people. He's also facing calls for austerity.
 
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August 29, 2014 | NPR · Congressman and former Republican vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan discusses his new book, The Way Forward: Renewing the American Idea.
 

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August 29, 2014 | NPR · The Obama administration is considering whether to broaden its air campaign against the extremist group the Islamic State by striking targets in Syria.
 
August 29, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the latest in Ukraine and the actions of ISIS in Iraq and Syria.
 
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August 29, 2014 | NPR · An earthquake in Napa Valley this week brought back old fears for author Gustavo Arellano. In his anxiety he's revisiting the book A Crack in the Edge of the World.
 

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August 23, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 1,500 people have died in the Ebola outbreak, and more nations in the region are closing their borders. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about the epidemic.
 

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August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

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Morning Edition for November 9, 2012

Nov 9, 2012 — Political historian Allan Lichtman says he sees elections the way geophysicists see earthquakes — as events fundamentally driven by structural factors deep beneath the surface, rather than by superficial events at the surface.
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Nov 9, 2012 — Car dealers in New York and Massachusetts have filed a lawsuit that seeks to block Tesla from selling its pricey electric vehicles in those states. The dealers say they are defending state franchise laws, which require manufacturers to sell cars through dealers they do not own.
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Nov 9, 2012 — Harvey Hilbert served in the Army infantry during the Vietnam War. He was injured in battle and saw a man in his unit killed. "You know, I'm 65 years old, and I can remember clearly that young man — the color of his skin, his face, his cries," Hilbert told StoryCorps.
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Nov 9, 2012 — An experimental vaccine for malaria reduces infants' risk of the disease by about a third. That's less than researchers had hoped for, given the vaccine's effectiveness in toddlers, but doctors say it's enough to prevent many high fevers, seizures and deaths in a lot of African children.
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Nov 9, 2012 — One of the biggest challenges Mitt Romney faced in his presidential campaign was the question of likability. Almost everyone who knows him likes him, but that likable guy was hard to find on the campaign trail — until the very end.
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Nov 9, 2012 — At health clinics along the Thai-Myanmar border, malaria is getting tougher to treat as resistance to medication grows. Doctors say it may be time to focus on eradicating malaria before the drugs lose potency.
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Nov 9, 2012 — Taylor Swift's new album sold more than a million copies in its first week — a rare feat these days. She did it by answering a surprisingly complex question: What's the best way to sell an album?
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more Morning Edition for November 9, 2012 from NPR