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August 1, 2014 | NPR · Renee Montagne talks with the head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr. Thomas Frieden, for the latest news about the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · CIA director John Brennan apologized to Sen. Dianne Feinstein, who had accused the CIA of spying on her committee's computers. Brennan at first denied it.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · It's one of the most popular items, but often it seems to be as far as humanly possible from the entrance. The Planet Money team looks at two very different theories about why that is.
 

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August 1, 2014 | NPR · House Republicans are delaying their August recess, sticking around Washington to try passing a bill meant to address the border crisis. Democrats and President Obama have already voiced their opposition to the bill on the table.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the beleaguered border bill in the House and the shattered cease-fire in Gaza.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Gaza took an ominous turn Friday, as a 72-hour humanitarian cease-fire fell apart within 90 minutes and the Israeli military announced its belief that one of its soldiers was captured by Hamas militants.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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The Salt Featured Two

Jul 29, 2014 — Sardines and other small, oily fish are some of the most nutritious in the sea. Now there's another reason to eat them: Fishermen use a lot less fuel to catch them than many other kinds of seafood.
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Jul 29, 2014 — Cacao "supertrees" in the north produce more pods with more seeds than ordinary cacao trees. A USAID project hopes to capitalize on that so Haiti can gain a foothold in the high-end chocolate market.
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Jul 25, 2014 — Some of us now monitor our steps, sleep and calorie intake with wristbands and apps. So why not track blood-alcohol levels? We explore the next frontier in the self-measurement movement.
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Jul 23, 2014 — Tour de France cyclists need to eat up to 9,000 calories a day to maintain their health and weight during the race. But many teams hire chefs to elevate the meals to gourmet status.
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Jul 22, 2014 — Many mainstream companies are creating GMO-free foods, but they're not publicizing the changes. Meanwhile, some are also fighting state initiatives that would require them to label GMOs ingredients.
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Jul 21, 2014 — A group of men in New York are challenging the stereotype that eating meat signifies manliness. Instead, they say that manhood can be proven by caring for the planet, not dominating it.
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Jul 18, 2014 — Soylent, the offbeat meal replacement company, has built an online community of more than 18,000 users. But some are impatient to get their orders, so they're making and selling it themselves.
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Jul 16, 2014 — Turns out that for 7,000 years, snacking on nutsedge may have helped people avoid tooth decay. But at some point, the root it lost its charm. By the 1970s, it was branded "the world's worst weed."
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Jul 16, 2014 — A craft brewer in Maine is partnering with a most unusual item — seaweed. If the beer takes off, the state's emerging seaweed aquaculture industry may benefit.
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Jul 15, 2014 — Officials say the snails are "highly invasive, voracious pests" that eat paint and stucco off houses. But the snails are a prized delicacy in West Africa, where they're marinated or grilled on sticks.
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