Latest News from NPR

on:

NCPR is supported by:

 
Hourly Newscast
4 min., 45 sec.

Programs

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
Getty Images
July 24, 2014 | NPR · Seven years after the subprime mortgage crisis, the U.S. economy has not yet fully recovered. Now two economists have come up with new evidence about what's holding the economy back.
 
AFP/Getty Images
July 24, 2014 | NPR · On Capitol Hill, dogs and their handlers have made the case that all U.S. military dogs should be brought home from war — and treated with the respect they've earned on the battlefield.
 
Getty Images
July 24, 2014 | NPR · Dozens of children have filed complaints saying they were subjected to inhumane treatment at Border Patrol stations. The complaints center on the holding cells, referred to as "freezers" by migrants.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
July 24, 2014 | NPR · A United Nations school, which was being used to shelter displaced Gazans awaiting evacuation, came under fire from a missile or shelling. The attack reportedly killed 15 people. Palestinian officials blame Israeli shelling; Israel says it may have been Hamas rockets that fell short of their target.
 
July 24, 2014 | NPR · The war in Gaza is unfolding between Israel and Hamas, but the Palestinian Authority, based in the West Bank, is also involved in efforts to end the fighting. The Palestine Liberation Organization's diplomatic representative to the U.S., Maen Areikat, speaks with Robert Siegel about the causes of the conflict and the possible consequences of a cease-fire.
 
Getty Images
July 24, 2014 | NPR · If no contract deal is reached by July 31, Metropolitan Opera General Manager Peter Gelb has warned union workers to plan for a work stoppage the next day.
 

Latest Saturday rundown




WE Saturday Feature

July 19, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Scott Simon talks with David Herzsenhorn of The New York Times about the latest developments in Ukraine, where a Malaysia Airlines passenger plane was downed on Thursday, killing 298 people.
 

Latest Sunday rundown


WE Sunday Feature

July 20, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Arun Rath gets the latest from correspondent Corey Flintoff at the site of last week's downing of a Malaysian jetliner in Eastern Ukraine.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

3-D printing

Mar 17, 2014 — Garrett Peterson was born with a defective windpipe and every day he struggled to breathe. Now, thanks to a 3-D printer, his windpipe has been strengthened and Garrett should soon breathe normally.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jan 23, 2014 — Also: Mary Miller on writing; Simon & Schuster acquires a book from the man behind the Twitter account @GSElevator; Mallory Ortberg imagines a "Choose Your Own P.G. Wodehouse Adventure."
Comments |
Nov 12, 2013 — You can print out almost anything with a 3-D printer, from weapons and prosthetic hands to Yoda figurines. Sure, you can buy a 3-D printer. But what if you wanted to make one yourself? It's easier than you might think.
Comments |
Nov 6, 2013 — You've heard of 3-D printing — now add one more dimension. Researchers are figuring out how to create structures that move and respond to their environment after they're printed.
Comments |
Oct 25, 2013 — The chemicals used in some 3-D printers can be toxic to humans. So researchers are looking to use naturally occurring vitamin B2 instead. They have already been able to make intricate, microscopic structures with the vitamin-rich material.
Comments |
Jul 12, 2013 — Other than the addition of garish colors of fiberglass, there hasn't been much innovation in cast technology in what seems like forever. But a New Zealand designer is bringing the latest in 3-D printing to orthopedics.
Comments |
May 23, 2013 — A 3-D printer is being credited with helping to save an Ohio baby's life, after doctors "printed" a tube to support a weak airway that caused him to stop breathing. The innovative procedure has allowed Kaiba Gionfriddo, of Youngstown, Ohio, to stay off a ventilator for more than a year.
Comments |
Mar 8, 2013 — The challenge, launching during the SXSW festival Saturday, asks anyone with an Internet connection to try to create a rocket engine. The 3-D designs can be edited by users around the globe, a model the organizers hope will decrease the cost of space innovation and unleash "untapped potential around the world."
Comments |
Mar 6, 2013 — As the tech industry prepares to descend on Austin, the breakout themes and apps of this year's festival remain unclear.
Comments |
Feb 20, 2013 — 3-D printing can be used to make food, guns and maybe human ears. Researchers say that using collagen to print out ear cartilage solves a lot of the problems in making new ears for people with birth defects or injuries.
Comments |
more 3-D printing from NPR