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August 28, 2014 | NPR · James Tomsheck was pushed out of his job as internal affairs chief for Customs and Border Protection in June. He warns the agency has become a paramilitary organization with little accountability.
 
August 28, 2014 | NPR · U.S. and Russian experts recently met on neutral territory, on an island in Finland, to try to work through issues that have been building up ever since Vladimir Putin returned to the Kremlin.
 
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August 28, 2014 | NPR · Foster Farms has been accused of poisoning its customers with salmonella bacteria. But in recent months, the company has become a leader in the poultry industry's fight against the foodborne pathogen.
 

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August 27, 2014 | NPR · The end of August heralds the start to the final phase of the 2014 election season. As primaries wrap up and candidates ready themselves for November, NPR's Charlie Mahtesian lays out the political landscape.
 
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August 27, 2014 | NPR · Across the nation, state legislators are gearing up for Election Day. And they're well aware that their fates could be tied to national political forces like the president's low approval rating.
 
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August 27, 2014 | NPR · Irn Bru is a neon orange soda that inspires passion and may help explain the strong independent streak in Scotland as it prepares to vote Sept. 18 on whether to break away from the United Kingdom.
 

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August 23, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 1,500 people have died in the Ebola outbreak, and more nations in the region are closing their borders. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about the epidemic.
 

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August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

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archeology

May 29, 2014 — Shakespeare described the 15th century British king as "deformed, unfinish'd," and a hunchback. A 3-D model of his spine reveals that Richard had developed severe curvature of the spine as a teen.
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Feb 20, 2014 — Two German men filmed themselves scraping off samples of the Great Pyramid in hopes of proving their theory that it was built 20,000 years ago by people from the legendary city of Atlantis.
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Feb 7, 2014 — Scientists have found the oldest-known footprints outside Africa, dating from between 800,000 and 1 million years ago, on a beach facing the North Sea.
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Nov 22, 2013 — Archaeologists have discovered the oldest wine cellar known, and the personal stash was massive: It once stored more than 500 gallons of vino. But these Bronze Age winemakers weren't just fermenting plain-old wine. They also got creative, infusing it with herbs and spices.
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May 30, 2013 — Since its discovery in 1911, an Egyptian iron bead has sparked debate over how it was produced — made around 3,300 BC, it predates the region's first known iron smelting by thousands of years. Now researchers say the iron was made in space, and delivered to Earth via meteorite.
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Apr 10, 2013 — Humans were using cookware as early as 15,000 years ago, according to a new analysis of ancient Japanese ceramic pots. Those first meals? Fish soup.
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Feb 26, 2013 — Civilization cannot live on anchovies alone. The ancient Norte Chico people of Peru were long thought to have built a complex society in South America while dining on a diet based on the tiny fish. But archaeologists now say they ate the food that fueled empires throughout the hemisphere — corn.
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