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April 17, 2014 | NPR · Scientists and food activists are launching a campaign to promote seeds that can be freely shared, rather than protected through patents and licenses. They call it the Open Source Seed Initiative.
 
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April 17, 2014 | NPR · A typical UPS truck now has hundreds of sensors on it. That's changing the way UPS drivers work — and it foreshadows changes coming for workers throughout the economy.
 
April 17, 2014 | NPR · Brazil is the spiritual home of soccer and a world powerhouse in the sport. It's woven into the Brazilian psyche. Wins and losses have had repercussions in other realms — including politics.
 

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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian tanks arrived in the city of Kramatorsk Wednesday morning. By the time they rolled out of the city, they were flying Russian flags. People in Kramatorsk tell the story of what happened.
 
April 16, 2014 | NPR · NATO has announced a strengthening of its forces near the alliance's eastern border. Gen. George Joulwan, the former NATO supreme allied commander for Europe, discusses the plan.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A 325 million-year-old fossil find shows that the gill structures of modern sharks are actually quite different from their ancient ancestors.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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medical tests

Dec 10, 2013 — After Angelina Jolie announced she has a genetic variant that raises her risk of breast cancer, many women asked their doctors for the test. Insurers will pay for tests only if there's a clear indication that it would help shape medical care. That's often not the case.
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Nov 20, 2013 — By a standard test most African-Americans have low levels of vitamin D. But most African-Americans also have strong bones. It turns out that the problem is with the test, which was looking for a form of D more common in Caucasians. The variation is a result of human evolution.
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Oct 28, 2013 — The medical screening tests offered by churches and other nonprofits may sound like a great idea. But some of the tests, which are performed by for-profit companies, are not recommended by national organizations because they can lead to invasive testing and unnecessary treatment.
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Sep 25, 2013 — Many older women get bone scans every two years to look for signs of osteoporosis. But for the vast majority of people, the repeat scans don't detect significant changes. New research suggests it may make sense to stop or slow down on the scans after people have had an initial test.
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Jul 8, 2013 — There are tests for heart attacks and diabetes, but few for brain disorders. Researchers are trying to change that, but are finding the hunt for biomarkers for mental illness to be a tough slog. Tests on the market, like ones for Alzheimer's, are not conclusive.
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Apr 25, 2013 — Problems at a Canadian factory have caused a shortage of tuberculosis tests in the U.S. Some hospitals and health departments around the country are deferring routing TB testing as a result.
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