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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The attorney general hugged community leaders, a highway patrol captain and the mother of Michael Brown during his visit, and got an update on the federal investigation into the teen's shooting.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · At McCluer High School, 30 varsity football players — all black, mostly from Ferguson — practice. David Greene talks to Sports Illustrated writer Robert Klemko about his story, "Football in Ferguson."
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · Kelly McEvers talks to Syria expert Shashank Joshi, about President Bashar al-Assad's tenacious grip on power. Joshi is with the Royal Services Institute in London.
 

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August 21, 2014 | KWMU · The violence at night in Ferguson, Mo., has calmed down for now. However, there have been more than 160 people arrested since the protests began. Police records offer a sense of who they are.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · The aftermath of the police shooting in Ferguson, Mo., has focused attention on police-involved killings more broadly in the U.S. But statistics on shootings by police are scarce. To learn why, Audie Cornish speaks with David Klinger, an associate professor at the University of Missouri in St. Louis.
 
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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The hunt is on to identify the man in the James Foley execution video who speaks with a British accent. An estimated 2,000 Europeans have left home to join the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Morning Edition for May 28, 2013

May 28, 2013 — After last week's deadly tornado in Moore, Okla,, hundreds of homes were damaged. Maurice Smith is optimistic about the future in Moore. So much so, he is planning to build a new home and sell the old one without an agent. And he expects it will be snapped up quickly. The reason? Displaced residents are looking for homes, and his has a storm shelter.
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May 28, 2013 — Chris Kyle was one of the deadliest American military snipers in history. In February, the former Navy SEAL was shot and killed — not on the battlefield, but on the homefront at the hands of a fellow veteran. David Greene talks to Nicholas Schmidle, who reports in the latest issue of The New Yorker magazine how these two men and their invisible scars of war intersected tragically.
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May 28, 2013 — Management gurus have long preached the value of ethical leadership. In the presence of ethical leadership — but the absence of ethical co-workers — what happens to people's honesty?
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May 28, 2013 — President Obama often tells audiences that he has waged his last campaign. But that's not exactly true. The White House is gearing up for a massive push this summer to get uninsured people to buy health care when sign-ups begin Oct. 1.
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May 28, 2013 — Blind entrepreneurs who own vending machines are worried that legislative mandates to replace junk food with more healthful items will impact their business. In Oregon, the vendors are collaborating with health officials to find a happy medium.
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May 28, 2013 — High costs and minimal insurance coverage may be keeping adults out of the hearing aid market. Private companies are trying to lower prices by selling the devices directly online, but specialists warn that comes with its own costs.
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May 28, 2013 — Philipp Meyer's second novel is a centuries-spanning family saga that chronicles the growth of Texas. Many hands are bloodied in the novel's conflicts: between settlers and Native Americans, between Texan ranchers and Mexicans, and finally, between ranchers and the oil men who take over the land.
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May 28, 2013 — Twenty-two million Americans served in the military, but the vast majority are from the Vietnam and Korea generations. They're getting older now, and many live in rural, sometimes remote places like Alaska, where reaching them to connect them with their benefits is difficult.
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May 28, 2013 — Indian reservations don't collect state property taxes, meaning most of their education budget comes directly from the federal government. With graduation rates already low, administrators worry about what larger class sizes and fewer school buses will do to the community.
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May 28, 2013 — There's fear and frustration in the capital, but even people who acknowledge President Bashar Assad's flaws often grimly hope for the rebels to go away: They believe the government's description of the rebels as terrorists and foreigners out to destroy the country.
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more Morning Edition for May 28, 2013 from NPR