Latest News from NPR

on:

NCPR is supported by:

 
Hourly Newscast
4 min., 45 sec.

Programs

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
AP
August 28, 2014 | NPR · James Tomsheck was pushed out of his job as internal affairs chief for Customs and Border Protection in June. He warns the agency has become a paramilitary organization with little accountability.
 
August 28, 2014 | NPR · U.S. and Russian experts recently met on neutral territory, on an island in Finland, to try to work through issues that have been building up ever since Vladimir Putin returned to the Kremlin.
 
NPR
August 28, 2014 | NPR · Foster Farms has been accused of poisoning its customers with salmonella bacteria. But in recent months, the company has become a leader in the poultry industry's fight against the foodborne pathogen.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
Tommy Trenchard for NPR
August 28, 2014 | NPR · The pay is generous — $1,000 a month. The risks are enormous. They collect the body of an Ebola victim, avoiding any contact that could infect them. They wear safety garb. And they pray.
 
August 28, 2014 | NPR · The Syrian civil war has flared up in the south of the country, near the Israeli border. A group of Islamist fighters have now captured a border crossing between Syria and Israel on the Golan Heights.
 
Getty Images
August 28, 2014 | NPR · The protests following Michael Brown's death have rekindled long-standing complaints about racist policing in the St. Louis area. Cops there are now becoming more outspoken in their own defense.
 

Latest Saturday rundown




WE Saturday Feature

August 23, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 1,500 people have died in the Ebola outbreak, and more nations in the region are closing their borders. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about the epidemic.
 

Latest Sunday rundown


WE Sunday Feature

August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

The Summer of '63

Aug 28, 2013 — It is not a marching song. It is not necessarily defiant. It is a promise: "We shall overcome someday. Deep in my heart, I do believe." It has been a civil rights song for 50 years now, heard not just in the U.S. but in North Korea, in Beirut, in Tiananmen Square, in South Africa's Soweto Township.
Launch in player | Comments |
Aug 19, 2013 — Yuri Kochiyama and her family were rounded up by the American government and forced to live behind barbed wire during World War II. Her brief friendship with Malcolm X inspired her activism.
Launch in player | Comments |
Aug 1, 2013 — In the '60s, Bob Moses organized African-American sharecroppers in Mississippi for the Civil Rights movement. Since the 1980s, he's led the Algebra Project, teaching math to low-achieving students in underfunded public schools and advocating for quality public education as a constitutional right.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jul 26, 2013 — In 1963, a jazz-obsessed, college-educated black Beat poet in New York wrote a "theoretical endeavor" linking the sociopolitical and the sonic. A half-century later, Amiri Baraka's book remains the first of its kind — and among the most important — in African-American studies.
Comments |
Jul 12, 2013 — Mary Hamilton, a field secretary for the Congress of Racial Equality, was arrested at an Alabama protest and refused to answer the judge unless he called her "Miss." It was custom for white people to get honorifics, but black people were called by first names.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jul 10, 2013 — The pop charts were dominated by feel-good summer songs during the summer of '63. But there was an alternate reality on the R&B charts, and young white listeners were tuning in.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jul 9, 2013 — As part of our ongoing coverage of the civil rights movement and the summer of 1963, NPR Music has created a stream of more than 100 songs inspired by that era.
Comments |
Jul 9, 2013 — The songs of the civil rights era are as varied as the people who have marched in the movement. We look back over five decades of passionate, engaged music-making — from singers in the struggle to young artists celebrating their political and musical heroes.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jun 28, 2013 — Fifty years ago, Kyu Sakamoto was the face of a new postwar Japan: a clean-cut, 21-year-old pop idol. But professor Ian Condry says that underlying the sweetness of the hit song "Sukiyaki" was a story of sadness and loss.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jun 21, 2013 — In 1963, civil rights activists wanted to recruit more of the city's young people to the cause. The way to their hearts was often through DJs and music.
Launch in player | Comments |
more The Summer of '63 from NPR