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April 18, 2014 | NPR · The agreement calls on all parties to refrain from violence, requires that illegally-armed groups disarm and that control of government buildings be returned to Ukrainian authorities.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · President Obama said enrollment under the Affordable Care Act reached 8 million after the deadline was extended by 2 weeks. The figure represents a turnaround from the disastrous debut of the website.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Morning Edition spent a lot of time recently reporting from the U.S.-Mexico border. President Obama has deported 2 million people from the U.S. But many say that number is misleading.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The military's training center at Fort Irwin in California is complete with mock Middle Eastern villages. But as the U.S. combat mission in Afghanistan winds down, how will this facility change?
 
April 19, 2014 | NPR · In the Ukrainian city of Donetsk, the opposing camps seem increasingly entrenched, despite a diplomatic effort to ease tensions. Pro-Russian forces refuse to leave occupied buildings and public squares in the east. It's an uneasy Easter weekend and neither side is willing to budge.
 
April 19, 2014 | NPR · Russia is in the middle of a planned upgrade and expansion of its military forces, but global affairs professor Mark Galeotti tells NPR's Arun Rath that Russia's military has its limits.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · Monday is the 2014 Boston Marathon. Security will be tight, and this year's race will be an emotional event that will be about much more than who wins.
 

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The Summer of '63

Aug 28, 2013 — It is not a marching song. It is not necessarily defiant. It is a promise: "We shall overcome someday. Deep in my heart, I do believe." It has been a civil rights song for 50 years now, heard not just in the U.S. but in North Korea, in Beirut, in Tiananmen Square, in South Africa's Soweto Township.
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Aug 19, 2013 — Yuri Kochiyama's family was part of a generation that was rounded up by the American government and forced to live behind barbed wire during World War II. Her later chance encounter with Malcolm X in 1963 sparked a friendship that helped inspire a lifelong commitment to activism.
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Aug 1, 2013 — In the '60s, Bob Moses organized African-American sharecroppers in Mississippi for the Civil Rights movement. Since the 1980s, he's led the Algebra Project, teaching math to low-achieving students in underfunded public schools and advocating for quality public education as a constitutional right.
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Jul 26, 2013 — In 1963, a jazz-obsessed, college-educated black Beat poet in New York wrote a "theoretical endeavor" linking the sociopolitical and the sonic. A half-century later, Amiri Baraka's book remains the first of its kind — and among the most important — in African-American studies.
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Jul 12, 2013 — Mary Hamilton, a field secretary for the Congress of Racial Equality, was arrested at an Alabama protest and refused to answer the judge unless he called her "Miss." It was custom for white people to get honorifics, but black people were called by first names.
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Jul 10, 2013 — The pop charts were dominated by feel-good summer songs during the summer of '63. But there was an alternate reality on the R&B charts, and young white listeners were tuning in.
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Jul 9, 2013 — As part of our ongoing coverage of the civil rights movement and the summer of 1963, NPR Music has created a stream of more than 100 songs inspired by that era.
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Jul 9, 2013 — The songs of the civil rights era are as varied as the people who have marched in the movement. We look back over five decades of passionate, engaged music-making — from singers in the struggle to young artists celebrating their political and musical heroes.
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Jun 28, 2013 — Fifty years ago, Kyu Sakamoto was the face of a new postwar Japan: a clean-cut, 21-year-old pop idol. But professor Ian Condry says that underlying the sweetness of the hit song "Sukiyaki" was a story of sadness and loss.
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Jun 21, 2013 — In 1963, civil rights activists wanted to recruit more of the city's young people to the cause. The way to their hearts was often through DJs and music.
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more The Summer of '63 from NPR