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July 28, 2014 | NPR · Argentina says it cannot pay certain debts and will fall into default by July 31 if it can't come to an agreement with creditors. This would be Argentina's second default in 13 years.
 
July 28, 2014 | NPR · Even though Spain's economy is out of recession, youth unemployment has hit 57.7 percent. Economists say it could be years before jobs return. By then, many will have missed a decade or more of work.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · To withstand their 9,300-mile migration, red knots feast on eggs from horseshoe crabs each spring in Delaware Bay. Scientists worry many crabs are starting to lay eggs before the birds can get there.
 

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July 28, 2014 | NPR · A new salvo has been fired in the fight over teacher tenure. A group led by former TV anchor Campbell Brown filed a complaint in New York state court, arguing that tenure laws are preventing the state from providing every child with the "sound, basic education" its constitution guarantees.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · Why are so many low-income and minority kids getting second-class educations in the U.S.? That question is at the center of the heated debate about tenure protections and who gets them.
 
July 28, 2014 | NPR · Only one movie in July, Transformers: Age of Extinction, has broken the 100 million mark during its opening weekend. Box office receipts all summer have proven anemic. Paul Dergarabedian, a senior media analyst with RENTRAK, talks to Audie Cornish about the box office slump.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Jul 28, 2014 — Adler joined NPR in 1979 and covered everything from the emergence of the AIDS epidemic to the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. She was 68.
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Dec 27, 2013 — Women are supposed to do three pullups, part of the new physical test intended to determine whether women are ready for ground combat. The pullup test has been put on hold because most female recruits have been unable to meet the standard.
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Jul 28, 2014 — Despite a demand from the United Nations Security Council for an immediate and unconditional cease-fire, fighting continued in Gaza, where the death toll has surpassed 1,000.
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Jul 26, 2014 — Nearly two decades ago, a massive wave struck a container ship and dumped nearly 5 million Legos pieces into the ocean. Today, they are still washing up on shores in England.
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Jul 22, 2014 — What does a 20 percent chance of rain or snow actually mean? Interpreting probabilities in forecasts can be hard even for mathematicians and meteorologists — never mind the average person.
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Jul 27, 2014 — NPR's Lidia Jean Kott talked to Jason Aaron, the writer of the new female Thor. When she first talked to him she knew nothing about superhero comics, but after some research she became a fan.
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Apr 15, 2014 — A recent study on immigrant job-seekers in the United Kingdom reminds us again of the importance of code-switching: Unwritten cultural codes in conversation can have far-reaching impacts.
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Jul 28, 2014 — Do you feel like you wander aimlessly through life, or is there a reason you're here? Psychologists say people with a sense of purpose may stress out less. Or they may lead healthier lives.
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Jul 26, 2014 — Two large radio telescopes have detected very brief, powerful bursts of radio waves, and so far, scientists have no idea what's causing them.
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May 4, 2014 — In 1914, 80 African men, women and children were brought to Oslo for the sole purpose of being gazed upon in a thatched hut village for five months by Norwegian natives.
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