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July 29, 2014 | NPR · House and Senate negotiators reached a compromise, $17 billion agreement to improve medical care for veterans. The deal comes in the final week before Congress leaves town for a monthlong recess.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Washington Post reporter Liz Sly tells Renee Montagne that U.S. arms may be flowing to moderate Syrian rebels, but the aid seems to be too little too late to affect the course of the civil war.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · The militant group threatens to kill parents who immunize their children. As a result, polio has come roaring back in Pakistan. Eradication now hinges on whether the country can control the virus.
 

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July 28, 2014 | NPR · A new salvo has been fired in the fight over teacher tenure. A group led by former TV anchor Campbell Brown filed a complaint in New York state court, arguing that tenure laws are preventing the state from providing every child with the "sound, basic education" its constitution guarantees.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · Why are so many low-income and minority kids getting second-class educations in the U.S.? That question is at the center of the heated debate about tenure protections and who gets them.
 
July 28, 2014 | NPR · Only one movie in July, Transformers: Age of Extinction, has broken the 100 million mark during its opening weekend. Box office receipts all summer have proven anemic. Paul Dergarabedian, a senior media analyst with RENTRAK, talks to Audie Cornish about the box office slump.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Science

Jun 23, 2014 — Dr. James Chang of Stanford University uses hands sculpted by Rodin, together with 3-D technology, to create an experience of augmented reality for his students and surgery trainees.
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Mar 16, 2014 — A group of physicists banned PowerPoint from forums, and they aren't the only people who say we should cut back on slide-based presentations: Others include Amazon, LinkedIn and NASA.
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Mar 11, 2014 — Thousands of non-scientists sitting at their home computers may now be as useful as a single Einstein — thanks to online crowdsourcing. What once took years, now takes days.
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Feb 20, 2014 — The first step in recognizing people could be telling the difference between a cat and a dog. Facebook is investing in artificial intelligence research, with the hopes of better sorting your photos.
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Jan 23, 2014 — Scientists at the Idaho National Laboratory created and tested an Android app that could allow your smartphone to detect gamma radiation. They say the technology could be used as radiation detectors by first responders.
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Dec 11, 2013 — The technology creates the illusion of taste by sending electrical and thermal stimulation to different parts of the tongue. Imagine tasting food on TV cooking shows, getting rewarded with a treat for succeeding in a video game or sharing a meal with a friend on social media.
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Oct 20, 2013 — The new RoboRoach project allows users to influence the movements of cockroaches with a smartphone. Greg Gage of Backyard Brains says it's not brain control but more like the bridle of a horse. The RoboRoach just provides a sensation that makes the cockroach perceive an obstacle.
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Sep 30, 2013 — Space organizations are taking potential leaps for mankind: SpaceX tries to reuse rocket parts, Orbital Sciences docks a craft to the International Space Station, and NASA is exploring the uses of 3-D printing. Spoiler: One of those uses is pizza.
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Sep 24, 2013 — Somehow, information about the Fed's bond buying decision got into computers in Chicago faster than the speed of light. Those milliseconds meant millions.
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Aug 13, 2013 — Existing concepts in science like linear induction motors and magnetic levitation are back in the spotlight thanks to Elon Musk's proposal for a rail system that can travel faster than the speed of sound.
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