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April 17, 2014 | NPR · Scientists and food activists are launching a campaign to promote seeds that can be freely shared, rather than protected through patents and licenses. They call it the Open Source Seed Initiative.
 
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April 17, 2014 | NPR · A typical UPS truck now has hundreds of sensors on it. That's changing the way UPS drivers work — and it foreshadows changes coming for workers throughout the economy.
 
April 17, 2014 | NPR · Brazil is the spiritual home of soccer and a world powerhouse in the sport. It's woven into the Brazilian psyche. Wins and losses have had repercussions in other realms — including politics.
 

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April 17, 2014 | NPR · President Obama met Thursday with insurance company executives and a separate group of insurance regulators from the states, discussing their mutual interest in administering the new health care law.
 
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April 17, 2014 | NPR · The president has visited Prince George's County, Md., four times this year. It is the most affluent county with an African-American majority. It also happens to be very close to the White House.
 
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April 17, 2014 | NPR · Kepler-186f is almost the same size as Earth, and it orbits in its star's "Goldilocks zone"-- where temperatures may be just right for life. But much is unknown because it's also 500 light-years away.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Code Switch: Word Watch

Apr 13, 2014 — The Persian and Indian garment was brought home by British colonials and made stylish for women by French designers. At first, PJs were seen as a cultural challenge to the American use of nightshirts.
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Mar 30, 2014 — The words used to describe race and ethnicity are ever in flux. A favored term one decade becomes pass the next and not nice soon after that. But, the motivation for change remains constant: Respect.
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Mar 23, 2014 — Vanilla has become a cultural metaphor for blandness and whiteness. But the flavor's history is rife with conquest and slavery and theft.
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Mar 17, 2014 — For our weekly word watch, we turn to "the idea of tremulous motion, swaying backwards and forward." Put another way, we are talking about swagger.
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Feb 24, 2014 — Citations dating back to 1886 hint that the phrase might come from a Cantonese word.
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Feb 16, 2014 — This network of performance venues — nightclubs, bars, juke joints and theaters — formed during Jim Crow because black performers in the U.S. didn't have access to white-owned clubs. But what did chitlins have to do with it?
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Feb 10, 2014 — "Moron" wasn't always hurled as an insult. The word was coined by Henry H. Goddard, a researcher and psychologist who intended it to be used as a medical term to quantify cognitive disabilities.
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Jan 27, 2014 — Being "sold down the river" means you've been betrayed. It used to mean something far worse. NPR's Code Switch traces the history of the phrase and spells out its original meaning in the first half of the 19th century.
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Jan 14, 2014 — Who was the first person to call a house a "crib"? We trace the answer from the Bard to MTV's show, Cribs.
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Jan 6, 2014 — The first recorded utterance of the word was by a man named Richard Henry Pratt, whose legacy among Native Americans and others is deeply contentious. His story illustrates problems with how the word is used today.
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more Code Switch: Word Watch from NPR