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August 19, 2014 | NPR · More than one week after the shooting death of an unarmed black teenager in a St. Louis suburb, protests continue. On Monday night, police fired tear gas and stun grenades to disperse demonstrators.
 
August 19, 2014 | NPR · The actions in Ferguson, Mo., have inspired talk about the militarization of U.S. police departments. The real question, is whether police have become militarized in their attitude toward the public.
 
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August 19, 2014 | KHN · Across the U.S., jails hold many more people with serious mental illness than state hospitals do. San Antonio is reweaving its safety net for the mentally ill — and saving $10 million annually.
 

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August 19, 2014 | NPR · Dr. Joanne Liu of Doctors Without Borders says fear and a lack of sense of urgency has kept the international community in their home countries rather than stepping up to the plate in West Africa.
 
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August 19, 2014 | NPR · The type of Ebola erupting in West Africa is closely related to one found 2,500 miles away — the distance between Boston and San Francisco. How did the virus spread so far without anyone noticing?
 
August 19, 2014 | NPR · Iranian poet and women's rights advocate Simin Behbahani has died. Her work probed the social and political challenges that faced Iran after its Islamic Revolution. She was 87.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Morning Edition for October 24, 2013

Oct 24, 2013 — Anita Elberse's new book, Blockbusters, examines the strategy behind making and marketing megahits. She tells NPR's Renee Montagne that content companies — publishers, movie studios and the like — can create blockbusters by dedicating most of their budgets to a select few likely winners.
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Oct 24, 2013 — To celebrate the 10th anniversary of StoryCorps, we revisit Laura Greenberg, who told her daughter Rebecca about her gregarious parents — and her awkward first kiss with Rebecca's father, Carl. Now, it's his turn to share his side of the family story.
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Oct 24, 2013 — From 1941 to 1943, J.D. Salinger exchanged letters with a young, aspiring writer in Toronto named Marjorie Sheard. The letters predate Catcher in the Rye, but Sheard may have been one of the first people to learn about its eventual protagonist, Holden Caulfield. Sheard's letters from Salinger are on display at the Morgan Library in New York.
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Oct 24, 2013 — In the past, many psychotherapists ran their own little businesses. But changes in health care coverage mean that many must start accepting insurance and doing paperwork. That's leading some therapists to form group practices or join large medical groups — and may lead to better care for patients.
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Oct 24, 2013 — In the battle against the bulge, lawmakers in Mexico are taking aim at consumers' pocketbooks. They're proposing a series of new taxes on high-calorie food and sodas. Health advocates say the higher prices will get Mexicans to change bad habits, but the beverage industry and small businesses are fighting back.
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Oct 24, 2013 — Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel is the force behind a proposed state law that would require mandatory prison time for a firearm offense. The arguments over mandatory minimum prison terms center on whether mandatory sentences actually deter people from committing crimes or take away judicial discretion and further overcrowd prisons.
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Oct 24, 2013 — A risky, expensive decision by local planners in the 1960s transformed Arlington, Va. — where everyone drove — to a place where people live, walk, bike, eat, play and commute, all without ever getting behind the wheel.
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Oct 24, 2013 — Charles Krauthammer once was a psychiatrist and a self-described "Great Society liberal." Now he's a Pulitzer Prize-winning, nationally syndicated conservative columnist. His new book, Things That Matter, presents a selection of his writings from three decades spent observing politics and culture.
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more Morning Edition for October 24, 2013 from NPR