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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The attorney general hugged community leaders, a highway patrol captain and the mother of Michael Brown during his visit, and got an update on the federal investigation into the teen's shooting.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · At McCluer High School, 30 varsity football players — all black, mostly from Ferguson — practice. David Greene talks to Sports Illustrated writer Robert Klemko about his story, "Football in Ferguson."
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · Kelly McEvers talks to Syria expert Shashank Joshi, about President Bashar al-Assad's tenacious grip on power. Joshi is with the Royal Services Institute in London.
 

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August 20, 2014 | NPR · Demonstrators want an indictment of the police officer who fatally shot Michael Brown earlier this month. But investigations — one of them a federal civil rights case — can take weeks, if not months.
 
August 20, 2014 | NPR · More than a week now from the police shooting in Ferguson, Mo., it's worth asking: Ideally, what should happen with a police officer stops someone in the street?
 
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August 20, 2014 | NPR · Enlisting has been a rite of passage for men in the Pierce family since the Civil War. And as America has changed, Mark Pierce and his son Jeremy explain, what it means to serve has, too.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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All Things Considered for November 11, 2013

Nov 11, 2013 — More than 600,000 have been left homeless and hungry by the devastating storm. In response, humanitarian agencies are mounting the largest relief operation since the Haitian earthquake in 2010. The biggest challenge right now is getting the basics — clean water and food — to the hardest hit areas.
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Nov 11, 2013 — Scientists say Typhoon Haiyan is one of the strongest ever recorded, though limited measurements may prevent them from declaring it as the record holder. Still, the storm was devastating: "We had a triple whammy of surge, very high winds and strong rainfall," says one climate scientist.
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Nov 11, 2013 — Perhaps no company showed how the Internet could turn sharing into a global phenomenon more than Napster. The music-sharing site upended the record industry. But the industry ultimately survived and free-music Napster did not. What are new businesses doing to avoid the same fate?
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Nov 11, 2013 — Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid is bringing up bills that are putting Republicans on the spot — like a measure to ban workplace discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity. It's pre-election-year positioning — and Republicans are trying to do the same.
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Nov 11, 2013 — From renting lightly used gowns to assembling Ikea furniture, things or tasks can now easily be rented or outsourced. Fast Company writer Danielle Sacks discusses the implications of the sharing economy and where it goes from here.
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Nov 11, 2013 — Residents say the phrase "Who Dat" is part and parcel of New Orleans culture. The chant opens Saints football games, and "Who Dat" can now be found on T-shirts and storefronts throughout the city. But a Texas company says it owns the ubiquitous phrase — and recently filed a lawsuit to stake its claim.
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Nov 11, 2013 — For decades, Coachella Valley High's mascot has been the Arab, a menacing-looking man with a hooked nose and a head wrap. School pep teams even lead belly dances during halftime shows. But last week, the mascot became national news when the American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee took issue with the depiction.
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Nov 11, 2013 — Like much of Europe, the French economy is still struggling. But a recent poll showed that more than 70 percent of the French were willing to pay more for goods made at home, and the numbers were supported by a strong turnout at a Made in France fair in Paris.
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Nov 11, 2013 — Lady Gaga has been building anticipation for her third studio album in ways that only she can manage. But perhaps the forte of ARTPOP lies in its marketing — not the actual music.
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Nov 11, 2013 — Lobbyists are known for their influence, but perhaps less obvious is that lobbyists often write legislation — sometimes word for word. In a recent example, media reports showed how bank lobbyists had a hand in drafting a House bill aimed at rolling back financial regulations.
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more All Things Considered for November 11, 2013 from NPR