Latest News from NPR

on:

NCPR is supported by:

 
Hourly Newscast
4 min., 45 sec.

Programs

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
September 1, 2014 | NPR · A Guinean student in the Senegalese capital of Dakar has tested positive for the deadly disease. David Greene talks to Krista Larson, West Africa correspondent for the Associated Press.
 
September 1, 2014 | NPR · Protesters surrounded Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif's home, and for a brief period forced government TV off the air. Steve Inskeep talks to Jon Boone, a correspondent for The Guardian in Islamabad.
 
YouTube
September 1, 2014 | NPR · A widely watched video shows a foreigner fainting on a subway car and everyone around him fleeing. No one helps. It's rekindled a national debate about trust, fear and the Chinese national character.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
September 1, 2014 | NPR · Ebola has exposed weaknesses in Africa's health networks and a failure to work together to arrest the spread of the virus. The "not our problem" response is taking an economic toll on the continent.
 
September 1, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 260 health workers in West Africa have been infected, and 134 have died. Dr. Robert Garry of Tulane University, who worked with five who died, discusses the devastation in the community.
 
YouTube
September 1, 2014 | NPR · Ads with candidates shooting guns are proliferating this year, and it can all be traced back to Sen. Joe Manchin's famed 2010 spot titled "Dead Aim."
 

Latest Saturday rundown




WE Saturday Feature

August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

Latest Sunday rundown


WE Sunday Feature

August 31, 2014 | NPR · Immigration remains one of the most challenging issues for President Obama. Political correspondent Mara Liasson discusses the political cost of the choices before him with Linda Wertheimer.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

All Things Considered for December 10, 2013

Dec 10, 2013 — This week we're looking back at the year in music with a peek at NPR Music's 50 Favorite Albums of 2013. It's the annual list assembled by our in-house experts, including NPR music writer and editor Stephen Thompson. He tells Audie Cornish about his picks in the world of indie pop.
Launch in player | Comments |
Dec 10, 2013 — In Brazil, an investigative commission has released a report that says ex-president Juscelino Kubitschek, thought to have died in a 1976 car accident, was murdered by the 1970's military regime.
Launch in player | Comments |
Dec 10, 2013 — President Hasan Rouhani has presented a draft budget for the coming Iranian fiscal year, which begins in March. It stands in stark contrast to the rosy revenue estimates and big-spending budgets of his predecessor, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. Economists say in real terms, accounting for Iran's still-high inflation rate, the Rouhani budget is a whopping 70 percent smaller on the spending side. And despite the optimistic talk from Iran's oil minister, the budget does not assume any significant rise in oil and gas revenues. Analysts say Rouhani's clear-eyed fiscal approach is a welcome change. But it puts even more pressure on nuclear negotiators to reach a comprehensive agreement with six world powers that will lead to the lifting of oil and banking sanctions, so the private sector can begin to fill the void left by the shrinking public spending.
Launch in player | Comments |
Dec 10, 2013 — Federal regulators moved to tighten banking rules to curb risky trading on Wall Street Thursday. The so-called Volcker rule, part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank regulatory overhaul, would preclude banks from making risky bets on their own accounts. Audie Cornish talks to Simon Johnson, a professor at MIT's Sloan School of Management, for more on what the rules will mean.
Launch in player | Comments |
Dec 10, 2013 — Democrats who control the Senate invoked the so-called "nuclear option" to make it easier for them to approve President Obama's nominations several weeks ago. On Tuesday, they put that option to use, ramming through approval for a new appeals court judge and unblocking the nomination of a new director for the Federal Housing Finance Agency.
Launch in player | Comments |
Dec 10, 2013 — French-backed African forces are making some headway to restore calm in the capital of Central African Republic. But humanitarian groups say the international response has been too slow as the conflict in the mineral-rich country takes on sectarian tones, pitting Muslims against Christians.
Launch in player | Comments |
Dec 10, 2013 — The journal PLoS ONE has a new study that finds organic whole milk has more heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids than conventional milk. It's being cited by organics advocates as clear evidence that organic milk is more nutritionally beneficial than conventional milk.
Launch in player | Comments |
Dec 10, 2013 — The cold snap that hammered Dallas five days ago is still creating problems. Thousands of people remain without power. Some truckers remain trapped at rest stops. And an unusual phenomenon called "cobblestone ice" is hampering crews from de-icing interstate bridges, overpasses and off-ramps.
Launch in player | Comments |
Dec 10, 2013 — The 2014 Winter Olympics will unfold in a resort town on the relatively warm Black Sea — a testament to how far man-made snow has come in recent years. The strategy to supply snow includes a massive system of more than 550 machines — plus insulated blankets to protect piles of already-made white stuff.
Launch in player | Comments |
Dec 10, 2013 — Since Hurricane Katrina, the hated rodents have flourished in piles of trash and blighted buildings. But when simply setting traps didn't work, city officials decided to take a more methodical approach to rat control. They're attacking the problems that invite the rats — and they're winning.
Launch in player | Comments |
more All Things Considered for December 10, 2013 from NPR