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July 25, 2014 | NPR · Steve Inskeep talks with Honduran Foreign Minister Mireya Aguero de Corrales, who's in Washington to help find a solution to the thousands of Central American children arriving at the U.S. border.
 
July 25, 2014 | WBUR · Massachusetts is offering to house hundreds of unaccompanied minors who've been detained crossing the U.S.-Mexico border. One of the proposed sites is on Cape Cod, but residents are blasting the plan.
 
July 25, 2014 | NPR · The novels of John le Carre have been reliable sources of compelling cinema. The new adaptation of "A Most Wanted Man" stars Philip Seymour Hoffman in one of his last roles.
 

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July 24, 2014 | NPR · A United Nations school, which was being used to shelter displaced Gazans awaiting evacuation, came under fire from a missile or shelling. The attack reportedly killed 15 people. Palestinian officials blame Israeli shelling; Israel says it may have been Hamas rockets that fell short of their target.
 
July 24, 2014 | NPR · The war in Gaza is unfolding between Israel and Hamas, but the Palestinian Authority, based in the West Bank, is also involved in efforts to end the fighting. The Palestine Liberation Organization's diplomatic representative to the U.S., Maen Areikat, speaks with Robert Siegel about the causes of the conflict and the possible consequences of a cease-fire.
 
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July 24, 2014 | NPR · If no contract deal is reached by July 31, Metropolitan Opera General Manager Peter Gelb has warned union workers to plan for a work stoppage the next day.
 

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July 19, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Scott Simon talks with David Herzsenhorn of The New York Times about the latest developments in Ukraine, where a Malaysia Airlines passenger plane was downed on Thursday, killing 298 people.
 

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July 20, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Arun Rath gets the latest from correspondent Corey Flintoff at the site of last week's downing of a Malaysian jetliner in Eastern Ukraine.
 

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All Things Considered for January 5, 2014

Jan 5, 2014 — Two years ago, strange sets of bewildering puzzles appeared on the Internet, with a message encouraging "highly intelligent individuals" to try to break the code. The code led to more clues spanning a global Internet mystery, that has yet to be solved.
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Jan 5, 2014 — Proposition 65 requires businesses to post public announcements about toxic chemicals in in their products. The law has been on the books for more than 20 years, and though it protects consumers, some say lawsuits over compliance disproportionately affect small businesses.
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Jan 5, 2014 — From 1943 to 1944, the Women Airforce Service Pilots flew more than 60 million miles across the United States chartering soldiers, test-flying planes and conducting training exercises during World War II. The 1,102 female pilots were honored at the Rose Parade on Wednesday, with eight veteran pilots taking a ride atop their float.
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Jan 5, 2014 — Researchers in Germany and the Czech Republic have found that dogs strongly prefer to relieve themselves facing either North or South, rather than East or West. Their research suggests it's all part of the Earth's magnetic fields.
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Jan 5, 2014 — NPR's Arun Rath talks to Daniel Alarcon, the author of At Night We Walk in Circles, about the new books he is most excited about for 2014.
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Jan 5, 2014 — The Sochi Winter Olympics are on track to being the most expensive games in Olympic history. A $265 million ski jump, 42,000 hotel rooms and a $51 billion budget. It's been called a financial fiasco, as Josh Yaffa of Bloomberg Businessweek tells NPR's Arun Rath.
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Jan 5, 2014 — This week, a federal judge upheld the government's right to search, without a warrant or "reasonable suspicion," a traveler's electronic devices at U.S. borders. The case had revolved around an American whose laptop was searched as he entered the U.S. from Canada. The federal government says such searches are rare, and, when they occur, help to protect the country. NPR's Arun Rath speaks with Susan Stellin, a contributor to The New York Times, about the ruling and what rights people have at U.S. borders.
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Jan 5, 2014 — The book, written in the 1970s, was made into a miniseries and never saw the light of day — until now. Actually, everything about The Spoils of Babylon is pure fiction. It's a parody of the big, bloated miniseries of the 1970s and '80s, complete with forbidden love between a sister and her adopted brother.
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Jan 4, 2014 — Women play an outsized role in the underground firearms marketplace. Often they handle illegal guns that are not for for their own use, but for men close to them. One Boston program is campaigning against gun violence, drawing connections between "crime guns" and domestic violence.
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Jan 4, 2014 — Sgt. Cody Wolf died in World War II on Jan. 11, 1944, when his plane was shot down. Weeks before his death, he contributed to a Christmas broadcast recorded on the front lines. His daughter, Margaret Ann Wolf Harris, heard that recording for the first time in December.
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more All Things Considered for January 5, 2014 from NPR