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July 29, 2014 | NPR · House and Senate negotiators reached a compromise, $17 billion agreement to improve medical care for veterans. The deal comes in the final week before Congress leaves town for a monthlong recess.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Washington Post reporter Liz Sly tells Renee Montagne that U.S. arms may be flowing to moderate Syrian rebels, but the aid seems to be too little too late to affect the course of the civil war.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · The militant group threatens to kill parents who immunize their children. As a result, polio has come roaring back in Pakistan. Eradication now hinges on whether the country can control the virus.
 

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July 28, 2014 | NPR · A new salvo has been fired in the fight over teacher tenure. A group led by former TV anchor Campbell Brown filed a complaint in New York state court, arguing that tenure laws are preventing the state from providing every child with the "sound, basic education" its constitution guarantees.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · Why are so many low-income and minority kids getting second-class educations in the U.S.? That question is at the center of the heated debate about tenure protections and who gets them.
 
July 28, 2014 | NPR · Only one movie in July, Transformers: Age of Extinction, has broken the 100 million mark during its opening weekend. Box office receipts all summer have proven anemic. Paul Dergarabedian, a senior media analyst with RENTRAK, talks to Audie Cornish about the box office slump.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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All Things Considered for January 11th, 2014

Jan 11, 2014 — Former Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon died Saturday at the age of 85. Israelis mourned the death of the celebrated politician and army general. But Palestinians reacted differently to the death of the controversial leader, who pushed for Jewish settlement of Palestinian territories.
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Jan 11, 2014 — Nuns sue to avoid contraceptive coverage. A baker refuses to make a cake for a same-sex wedding. These ongoing battles bring into question the scope of the right to religious liberty in America. Where do one person's rights end and another's begin?
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Jan 11, 2014 — Reporting from inside Iran has been very difficult for Western reporters over the last several years. The disputed 2009 elections triggered massive anti-government protests. In response, Iran cracked down hard on protesters, and clamped down tightly on journalists' access. That has begun to change with Iran's newly elected president, Hassan Rouhani. Scott Peterson, reporter for the Christian Science Monitor, was recently able to visit and report from Iran for the first time in more than four years. Peterson speaks with host Arun Rath about his trip.
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Jan 11, 2014 — Next week, Egypt holds yet another referendum on its constitution. We talk to political scientist Nathan Brown on what the likely outcome is, and if it could mean more stability in the country.
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Jan 11, 2014 — A Delta Air Lines flight from Minneapolis to Atlanta on Monday marked the end of an era for the McDonnell Douglas DC-9. The passenger jet first took flight in 1965 and was known for its relatively small size, which let it land on short runways and expand air travel across the nation.
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Jan 11, 2014 — Research psychologist Peggy Drexler is calling for an end to the "hugging arms race," particularly at work. She has ways for non-huggers to avoid an unwanted embrace without feeling awkward.
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Jan 11, 2014 — Samantha Schoech has struggled with weight for most of her life. As a feminist, she's also questioned society's expectations of beauty, while still wanting to be healthy and thin. The self-proclaimed "life-long yo-yo dieter" recently started taking diet pills.
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Jan 11, 2014 — Every month, comedian Paul F. Tompkins plays the late science fiction author H.G. Wells in hosting different famed writers (played by some of comedy's hottest stars) for in-depth interviews about their work, their personal lives and their anger at critics.
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Jan 11, 2014 — In her new book, The Trip To Echo Spring, Olivia Laing investigates the role of drinking in the lives of six great American writers: Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, John Cheever, John Berryman, Tennessee Williams and Raymond Carver.
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more All Things Considered for January 11th, 2014 from NPR