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August 20, 2014 | NPR · If you venture away from the protest zone in Ferguson, Mo., there is an idyllic neighborhood, which doesn't have much patience for the out-of-towners who have joined the protests.
 
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August 20, 2014 | NPR · President Obama has carefully avoided taking sides following the shooting of Missouri teen Michael Brown, disappointing some African-American observers.
 
August 20, 2014 | NPR · Texas ranks 49th out of 50 states in how much funding it commits to mental health. But San Antonio has become a model for other mental health systems. It has saved $50 million over the past 5 years.
 

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August 20, 2014 | NPR · Demonstrators want an indictment of the police officer who fatally shot Michael Brown earlier this month. But investigations — one of them a federal civil rights case — can take weeks, if not months.
 
August 20, 2014 | NPR · More than a week now from the police shooting in Ferguson, Mo., it's worth asking: Ideally, what should happen with a police officer stops someone in the street?
 
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August 20, 2014 | NPR · Enlisting has been a rite of passage for men in the Pierce family since the Civil War. And as America has changed, Mark Pierce and his son Jeremy explain, what it means to serve has, too.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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All Things Considered for February 10, 2014

Feb 10, 2014 — The jury has begun deliberations in the federal corruption trial of former New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin. Nagin is accused of accepting hundreds of thousands of dollars from businessmen in exchange for steering city business their way after Hurricane Katrina. NPR's Debbie Elliott was in court on Monday and speaks to host Robert Siegel about the day's developments.
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Feb 10, 2014 — Many governors are looking to use their budget surpluses to cut taxes or restore funding to programs that were slashed during lean times. But in an election year, these surpluses are setting up potential political battles.
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Feb 10, 2014 — Why was Marius, a healthy 18-month-old giraffe, killed on Sunday at the Copenhagen Zoo? Employees say it's because Marius had genes too similar to other giraffes and was killed to avoid inbreeding. But the act has caused an uproar on social media and among animal activists. Robert Siegel talks to Bengt Holst, the scientific director at the Copenhagen Zoo, about the decision to put the giraffe down.
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Feb 10, 2014 — Former University of Missouri football player Michael Sam revealed over the weekend that he is gay. Sam, an All-American defensive lineman, may become the first openly gay player in the history of the NFL if he is selected in this year's draft. Since he made his announcement, reactions have streamed in from every corner of the football world.
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Feb 10, 2014 — Former University of Missouri defensive end Michael Sam announced over the weekend that he was gay. Sam, who likely will soon enter the upcoming NFL draft, may become the first openly gay player ever in the NFL. Melissa Block gets the story behind Sam's decision from Cyd Zeigler, the editor and co-founder of OutSports, a sports news website that is dedicated to covering lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender athletes.
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Feb 10, 2014 — Melissa Block speaks with Sam Dagher of The Wall Street Journal about the latest developments in the Syrian city of Homs. A temporary humanitarian cease-fire has been extended for three more days since the U.N.-brokered deal took effect Friday. Hundreds of civilians have been evacuated from Homs' Old City, a rebel-held territory that has been under siege by government forces for more than a year.
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Feb 10, 2014 — The Egyptian security forces have targeted the Muslim Brotherhood, which is now classified as a terrorist group. But the crackdown has gone well beyond the one Islamist organization and now encompasses most everyone voicing dissent.
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Feb 10, 2014 — For 44 years, British author Penelope Lively has been publishing children's books, short stories and novels. Her latest book, Dancing Fish and Ammonites, is subtitled "A Memoir," but critic Ellah Allfrey says it is "more a collection of thoughts, a scattering of advice and a reading list to treasure."
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Feb 10, 2014 — The winter weather in Britain is even worse than people expected this year. For more than a month now, the British Isles have been battered with storms that have destroyed train tracks, blocked roads and flooded large parts of the country. And as NPR's Ari Shapiro reports from London, there's no end in sight to the dismal weather.
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Feb 10, 2014 — Much of the attention on the Olympic slopestyle events has focused on snowboarders, but the downhill event is also done on skis. Devin Logan enters Tuesday's competition as the world's top-ranked female freestyle skier. And at 20, she'll compete before she can legally celebrate with a beer.
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more All Things Considered for February 10, 2014 from NPR