Latest News from NPR

on:

NCPR is supported by:

 
Hourly Newscast
4 min., 45 sec.

Programs

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
July 29, 2014 | NPR · House and Senate negotiators reached a compromise, $17 billion agreement to improve medical care for veterans. The deal comes in the final week before Congress leaves town for a monthlong recess.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Washington Post reporter Liz Sly tells Renee Montagne that U.S. arms may be flowing to moderate Syrian rebels, but the aid seems to be too little too late to affect the course of the civil war.
 
AFP/Getty Images
July 28, 2014 | NPR · The militant group threatens to kill parents who immunize their children. As a result, polio has come roaring back in Pakistan. Eradication now hinges on whether the country can control the virus.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
Courtesy of Samaritan's Purse
July 29, 2014 | KERA · After caring for Ebola patients for several months in West Africa, Dr. Kent Brantly noticed last week that he had symptoms. The 33-year-old immediately put himself into a Liberian isolation ward.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Virologist Thomas Geisbert has spent decades studying Ebola and other hemorrhagic fevers. He speaks to Audie Cornish about the current Ebola outbreak, the worst in history, and how it might be contained this time around.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · The Eid festival, which celebrates the end of Ramadan, serves as a time for visiting relatives and exchanging gifts. But one family's holiday in Gaza traces the death and displacement wrought by the war between Hamas and Israel.
 

Latest Saturday rundown




WE Saturday Feature

July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

Latest Sunday rundown


WE Sunday Feature

July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

All Things Considered for February 18, 2014

Feb 18, 2014 — President Obama will be in Mexico on Wednesday to talk about trade and commerce. Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto has made the economy the cornerstone of his administration's agenda, but security is still a major problem in parts of the country. Nowhere are the challenges more daunting than in the western state of Michoacan, where civilian militias have been fighting a ruthless drug cartel and federal forces have moved in to try to restore calm.
Launch in player | Comments |
Feb 18, 2014 — On the eve of President Obama's visit to Mexico, Robert Siegel speaks with Arturo Sarukhan, former Mexican ambassador to the United States. They discuss the security situation in Mexico, the prospects for immigration reform and the trade agreements shared by the two countries.
Launch in player | Comments |
Feb 18, 2014 — The AFL-CIO executive committee is meeting in Texas this week to discuss the United Auto Workers' defeat in efforts to organize a Tennessee Volkswagen plant. Committee member hope to decipher what it may mean for other union membership drives across the South.
Launch in player | Comments |
Feb 18, 2014 — The Congressional Budget Office is projecting job losses as a result of a proposed federal minimum wage increase. The raise to the hourly wage has been a cornerstone of President Obama's recent policy speeches. According to predictions by the non-partisan CBO, approximately 500,000 jobs would be lost by late 2016 due to such a law's implementation.
Launch in player | Comments |
Feb 18, 2014 — We're so close to spring, we can nearly smell the flowers on the breeze — but we're by no means there yet. Dance out the wait with our Cabin Fever Playlist, 90 songs suggested by listeners and curated by producers at All Things Considered.
Launch in player | Comments |
Feb 18, 2014 — It used to be easy to buy a light bulb. But the transition to more energy-efficient lighting means choosing from an array of products. We help you navigate the world of the 21st century light bulb.
Launch in player | Comments |
Feb 18, 2014 — In 2007, Missouri repealed a law requiring gun buyers to obtain a license demonstrating they'd first passed a background check. In the years that followed, the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Policy and Research tracked the results. In the forthcoming issue of Journal of Urban Health, the center will release it's findings: The law's repeal was associated with an additional 55 to 63 murders per year in Missouri between 2008 and 2012. For more on the report, Audie Cornish speaks with Daniel Webster, the director of the center.
Launch in player | Comments |
Feb 18, 2014 — With so much pressure on schools to improve test scores, music and the arts sometimes fall off the list of priorities. That's led advocates for music education to point out its benefits in the classroom.
Launch in player | Comments |
Feb 18, 2014 — Ukraine saw a revival of unrest on Tuesday. After some days of relative calm, clashes between protesters and government forces reportedly began again, with demonstrators chanting "shame" and hurling Molotov cocktails at riot police. It remains unclear how many people were killed in the protests. Robert Siegel speaks with journalist David Stern, who is in Kiev, Ukraine, for more on the renewed protests as they happen.
Launch in player | Comments |
Feb 18, 2014 — German Chancellor Angela Merkel has proposed a European communications network that would contain online communications within that continent. David Meyer, senior writer at GigaOM, tells Audie Cornish about the source of this idea and whether or not it's feasible.
Launch in player | Comments |
more All Things Considered for February 18, 2014 from NPR