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July 29, 2014 | NPR · House and Senate negotiators reached a compromise, $17 billion agreement to improve medical care for veterans. The deal comes in the final week before Congress leaves town for a monthlong recess.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Washington Post reporter Liz Sly tells Renee Montagne that U.S. arms may be flowing to moderate Syrian rebels, but the aid seems to be too little too late to affect the course of the civil war.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · The militant group threatens to kill parents who immunize their children. As a result, polio has come roaring back in Pakistan. Eradication now hinges on whether the country can control the virus.
 

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July 29, 2014 | KERA · After caring for Ebola patients for several months in West Africa, Dr. Kent Brantly noticed last week that he had symptoms. The 33-year-old immediately put himself into a Liberian isolation ward.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Virologist Thomas Geisbert has spent decades studying Ebola and other hemorrhagic fevers. He speaks to Audie Cornish about the current Ebola outbreak, the worst in history, and how it might be contained this time around.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · The Eid festival, which celebrates the end of Ramadan, serves as a time for visiting relatives and exchanging gifts. But one family's holiday in Gaza traces the death and displacement wrought by the war between Hamas and Israel.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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All Things Considered for April 2, 2014

Apr 2, 2014 — A Senate committee vote, expected this week, marks the latest chapter in a bitter power struggle between Congress and the CIA over detention and interrogation practices.
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Apr 2, 2014 — Risks to astronauts on extended missions include vision impairment, weakened bones and radiation exposure. There are also psychological risks from facing danger while being stuck inside a small craft.
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Apr 2, 2014 — Adam Lioz, of the public policy organization Demos, says that Wednesday's Supreme Court ruling will further empower a small, elite group of political donors. He offers a critical perspective on the ruling.
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Apr 2, 2014 — Attitudes toward drug use continue to evolve. A new poll from the Pew Research Center shows that more people favor alternatives to prison for non-violent drug offenders.
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Apr 2, 2014 — The IRS has not audited a church in five years. Some televangelists are taking advantage of that inaction to shield millions of dollars from public scrutiny.
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Apr 2, 2014 — Texans overwhelmingly choose cars and trucks for their commutes, but in cities like Houston, Dallas and San Antonio, policy leaders have incentives to support cycling. They say it's good for business.
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Apr 2, 2014 — The rural Texas town was established as a "freedom colony" with land given to former slaves after the Civil War. O. Rufus Lovett photographed Weeping Mary and its residents for 11 years.
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Apr 2, 2014 — A divided Supreme Court eliminated the overall limits on a donor's contributions to federal candidates and campaigns, while leaving in place the limit on what a donor may give to one candidate.
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Apr 2, 2014 — The story of the changing demographics in Texas can, in many ways, be told through the family history of Julian Castro, the mayor of San Antonio. Mayor Castro discusses his story, as well as what Texas' expanding Hispanic population means for the state's political future.
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Apr 2, 2014 — The incumbent mayor of the nation's capital will not be re-elected. A federal investigation into Vincent Gray's 2010 campaign, along with allegations lodged just weeks before the election, helped propel his closest opponent to a surprise double-digit victory in the Democratic primary.
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more All Things Considered for April 2, 2014 from NPR