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September 1, 2014 | NPR · A Guinean student in the Senegalese capital of Dakar has tested positive for the deadly disease. David Greene talks to Krista Larson, West Africa correspondent for the Associated Press.
 
September 1, 2014 | NPR · Protesters surrounded Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif's home, and for a brief period forced government TV off the air. Steve Inskeep talks to Jon Boone, a correspondent for The Guardian in Islamabad.
 
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September 1, 2014 | NPR · A widely watched video shows a foreigner fainting on a subway car and everyone around him fleeing. No one helps. It's rekindled a national debate about trust, fear and the Chinese national character.
 

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September 1, 2014 | NPR · Ebola has exposed weaknesses in Africa's health networks and a failure to work together to arrest the spread of the virus. The "not our problem" response is taking an economic toll on the continent.
 
September 1, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 260 health workers in West Africa have been infected, and 134 have died. Dr. Robert Garry of Tulane University, who worked with five who died, discusses the devastation in the community.
 
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September 1, 2014 | NPR · Ads with candidates shooting guns are proliferating this year. It can all be traced back to Sen. Joe Manchin's famed 2010 spot "Dead Aim."
 

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August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

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August 31, 2014 | NPR · Immigration remains one of the most challenging issues for President Obama. Political correspondent Mara Liasson discusses the political cost of the choices before him with Linda Wertheimer.
 

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Essay

May 6, 2009 — China's government and developers are sinking money into tourism projects around the zone where tens of thousands of people died in last May's earthquake. From laser tag in Baoshan to a museum in Dayi that will feature quake simulators, they're aiming to boost the local economy — and memorialize the dead.
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May 5, 2009 — Two days after the earthquake struck southwestern China last May, Melissa Block interviewed a couple as rescue workers searched for their toddler son and his grandparents who were buried under a collapsed apartment building. Block checks in with the boy's aunt to see how the family is coping with the loss of its loved ones.
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May 4, 2009 — When the 7.9 magnitude earthquake hit southwest China in May 2008, Beichuan county was among the hardest hit. Now, Beichuan is abandoned, but it's becoming a tourist attraction. Vendors like Mu Zhenxian, who lost 16 family members, sell photos of the burial ground.
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Apr 24, 2009 — Steve Inskeep prepared for his trip to Detroit by watching movies that riff on the city, such as: Gran Torino, 8 Mile, Gross Pointe Blank, and Airplane.
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Apr 24, 2009 — In the center of Detroit, a 24-foot-long sculpture of Joe Louis' fist plunges outward, throwing a defiant right punch on Jefferson Avenue. Some think the sculpture is too violent. Others think it represents the bullheaded determination that gives this city its resilience.
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Mar 30, 2009 — The acclaimed street photographer died in her sleep over the weekend; she was 95. In 2001, NPR's Melissa Block interviewed Levitt — in what she describes as one of toughest she has ever conducted.
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Mar 30, 2009 — Washington and Moscow have often inched toward rapprochement. Amid the Cold War, one iconic episode of detente took place 50 years ago this summer. It has special significance for NPR's Moscow correspondent.
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Mar 19, 2009 — For the past nine years, Rep. John Lewis has led a civil rights pilgrimage to Selma, Montgomery and Birmingham. This year, Nina Totenberg joined the group — and saw Attorney General Eric Holder, an African-American, embrace the daughter of segregationist and former Gov. George Wallace.
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Mar 10, 2009 — Many Chinese are convinced that whatever sort of modernization their country achieves, it must combine aspects of Chinese traditional culture with imported Western institutions.
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Mar 8, 2009 — In 2001, reporter Deborah George was in Sierra Leone reporting on how the worldwide trade in illicit diamonds was fueling the war. There, she found a little girl who was too young to have her dreams be over.
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