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August 1, 2014 | NPR · Renee Montagne talks with the head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr. Thomas Frieden, for the latest news about the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · CIA director John Brennan apologized to Sen. Dianne Feinstein, who had accused the CIA of spying on her committee's computers. Brennan at first denied it.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · It's one of the most popular items, but often it seems to be as far as humanly possible from the entrance. The Planet Money team looks at two very different theories about why that is.
 

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August 1, 2014 | NPR · House Republicans are delaying their August recess, sticking around Washington to try passing a bill meant to address the border crisis. Democrats and President Obama have already voiced their opposition to the bill on the table.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the beleaguered border bill in the House and the shattered cease-fire in Gaza.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Gaza took an ominous turn Friday, as a 72-hour humanitarian cease-fire fell apart within 90 minutes and the Israeli military announced its belief that one of its soldiers was captured by Hamas militants.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Essay

May 6, 2009 — China's government and developers are sinking money into tourism projects around the zone where tens of thousands of people died in last May's earthquake. From laser tag in Baoshan to a museum in Dayi that will feature quake simulators, they're aiming to boost the local economy — and memorialize the dead.
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May 5, 2009 — Two days after the earthquake struck southwestern China last May, Melissa Block interviewed a couple as rescue workers searched for their toddler son and his grandparents who were buried under a collapsed apartment building. Block checks in with the boy's aunt to see how the family is coping with the loss of its loved ones.
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May 4, 2009 — When the 7.9 magnitude earthquake hit southwest China in May 2008, Beichuan county was among the hardest hit. Now, Beichuan is abandoned, but it's becoming a tourist attraction. Vendors like Mu Zhenxian, who lost 16 family members, sell photos of the burial ground.
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Apr 24, 2009 — Steve Inskeep prepared for his trip to Detroit by watching movies that riff on the city, such as: Gran Torino, 8 Mile, Gross Pointe Blank, and Airplane.
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Apr 24, 2009 — In the center of Detroit, a 24-foot-long sculpture of Joe Louis' fist plunges outward, throwing a defiant right punch on Jefferson Avenue. Some think the sculpture is too violent. Others think it represents the bullheaded determination that gives this city its resilience.
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Mar 30, 2009 — The acclaimed street photographer died in her sleep over the weekend; she was 95. In 2001, NPR's Melissa Block interviewed Levitt — in what she describes as one of toughest she has ever conducted.
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Mar 30, 2009 — Washington and Moscow have often inched toward rapprochement. Amid the Cold War, one iconic episode of detente took place 50 years ago this summer. It has special significance for NPR's Moscow correspondent.
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Mar 19, 2009 — For the past nine years, Rep. John Lewis has led a civil rights pilgrimage to Selma, Montgomery and Birmingham. This year, Nina Totenberg joined the group — and saw Attorney General Eric Holder, an African-American, embrace the daughter of segregationist and former Gov. George Wallace.
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Mar 10, 2009 — Many Chinese are convinced that whatever sort of modernization their country achieves, it must combine aspects of Chinese traditional culture with imported Western institutions.
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Mar 8, 2009 — In 2001, reporter Deborah George was in Sierra Leone reporting on how the worldwide trade in illicit diamonds was fueling the war. There, she found a little girl who was too young to have her dreams be over.
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