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July 22, 2014 | NPR · Foreign ministers meeting Tuesday in Brussels are threatening deep sanctions against Russia over the Malaysia Airlines crash. But some nations might hesitate because of their economic ties to Russia.
 
July 22, 2014 | NPR · Renee Montagne talks to Anton La Guardia, who covers the European Union for The Economist, about the possibility of deep EU sanctions against Russia at Tuesday's foreign ministers meeting.
 
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July 22, 2014 | NPR · Florida Sen. Marco Rubio tells NPR the nation can't "absorb" all migrants fleeing violence and must secure its own border first. He dismissed potential 2016 rival Hillary Clinton as old news.
 

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July 22, 2014 | NPR · Two weeks into the conflict in the Gaza Strip, more than 600 Palestinians — mostly civilians — and 29 Israelis have been killed. Two recent Israeli strikes, on a school and a hospital, reflect the scope of Israel's offensive.
 
July 22, 2014 | NPR · U.S. airlines have canceled flights to Israel after reports of Hamas rockets landing near Ben Gurion International Airport outside Tel Aviv.
 
July 22, 2014 | NPR · Secretary of State John Kerry has finished his first full day in Cairo, where he's trying to help forge a cease-fire between Israel and Hamas in the Gaza Strip.
 

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July 19, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Scott Simon talks with David Herzsenhorn of The New York Times about the latest developments in Ukraine, where a Malaysia Airlines passenger plane was downed on Thursday, killing 298 people.
 

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July 20, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Arun Rath gets the latest from correspondent Corey Flintoff at the site of last week's downing of a Malaysian jetliner in Eastern Ukraine.
 

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The 2005 Pulitzer Prize Winners

Apr 4, 2005 — The Los Angeles Times and The Wall Street Journal each win two Pulitzer Prizes in journalism. Steve Coll wins the non-fiction prize for Ghost Wars: The Secret History of the CIA, Afghanistan, and Bin Laden.
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Apr 5, 2005 — Michele Norris talks with Santiago Lyon, director of photography for the Associated Press, about the team of AP photographers whose work in Iraq over the past year earned them the Pulitzer Prize for breaking news photography. Five of the 11 photographers whose work was included in the winning portfolio are Iraqi.
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Apr 5, 2005 — Reporter Nigel Jaquiss is among this year's Pulitzer Prize winners. Jaquiss, of Willamette Week of Portland, Ore., won for his investigative reporting on a 30-year state secret: The story of former Gov. Neil Goldschmidt's sexual abuse of a 14-year-old girl.
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Dec 28, 2003 — Liane Hansen and historian David Hackett Fischer visit the banks of the Delaware River to discuss Washington's triumphant December 1776 crossing and Fischer's book on the subject.
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Apr 5, 2005 — Steven Stucky, a Cornell professor, composer and conductor, has won the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for music. His award-winning composition, the Second Concerto for Orchestra, premiered March 12, 2004.
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Apr 4, 2005 — Steve Coll wins the Pulitzer Prize in general non-fiction for his book Ghost Wars: The Secret History of the CIA, Afghanistan and Bin Laden. Robert Siegel talks with Coll, former managing editor of The Washington Post.
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Sep 15, 2004 — In a series of essays, commentator Steve Coll reflects on how terrorism binds voters in America, Afghanistan and Pakistan. His new book Ghost Wars chronicles the CIA's covert history in Afghanistan and Osama bin Laden's rise.
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Mar 31, 2005 — The new play Doubt opens on Broadway. It examines revelations about child molestation in the Catholic Church. Playwright John Patrick Shanley's own experience as a Catholic schoolboy lends an air of legitimacy to the story.
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Mar 25, 2005 — Robinson's first novel, Housekeeping, won a PEN/Hemingway Award. Now, 23 years later, her second novel, Gilead, has won the National Book Critics Circle Award. The book is written as a letter from a 76-year-old Congregationalist preacher to his 7-year-old son. This interview originally aired Feb. 8, 2005.
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Nov 23, 2004 — Alan Cheuse reviews Gilead by Marilynne Robinson, a novel narrated by a Christian minister as he nears death. Cheuse calls it a "beautifully ruminative novel."
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more The 2005 Pulitzer Prize Winners from NPR