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April 17, 2014 | NPR · Scientists and food activists are launching a campaign to promote seeds that can be freely shared, rather than protected through patents and licenses. They call it the Open Source Seed Initiative.
 
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April 17, 2014 | NPR · A typical UPS truck now has hundreds of sensors on it. That's changing the way UPS drivers work — and it foreshadows changes coming for workers throughout the economy.
 
April 17, 2014 | NPR · Brazil is the spiritual home of soccer and a world powerhouse in the sport. It's woven into the Brazilian psyche. Wins and losses have had repercussions in other realms — including politics.
 

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April 17, 2014 | NPR · President Obama met Thursday with insurance company executives and a separate group of insurance regulators from the states, discussing their mutual interest in administering the new health care law.
 
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April 17, 2014 | NPR · President Obama has visited Prince George's County, MD, four times this year. It is the most affluent county with an African American majority, and also happens to be very close to the White House.
 
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April 17, 2014 | NPR · Kepler-186f is almost the same size as Earth, and it orbits in its star's "Goldilocks zone"-- where temperatures may be just right for life. But much is unknown because it's also 500 light-years away.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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The 2005 Pulitzer Prize Winners

Apr 4, 2005 — The Los Angeles Times and The Wall Street Journal each win two Pulitzer Prizes in journalism. Steve Coll wins the non-fiction prize for Ghost Wars: The Secret History of the CIA, Afghanistan, and Bin Laden.
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Apr 5, 2005 — Michele Norris talks with Santiago Lyon, director of photography for the Associated Press, about the team of AP photographers whose work in Iraq over the past year earned them the Pulitzer Prize for breaking news photography. Five of the 11 photographers whose work was included in the winning portfolio are Iraqi.
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Apr 5, 2005 — Reporter Nigel Jaquiss is among this year's Pulitzer Prize winners. Jaquiss, of Willamette Week of Portland, Ore., won for his investigative reporting on a 30-year state secret: The story of former Gov. Neil Goldschmidt's sexual abuse of a 14-year-old girl.
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Dec 28, 2003 — Liane Hansen and historian David Hackett Fischer visit the banks of the Delaware River to discuss Washington's triumphant December 1776 crossing and Fischer's book on the subject.
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Apr 5, 2005 — Steven Stucky, a Cornell professor, composer and conductor, has won the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for music. His award-winning composition, the Second Concerto for Orchestra, premiered March 12, 2004.
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Apr 4, 2005 — Steve Coll wins the Pulitzer Prize in general non-fiction for his book Ghost Wars: The Secret History of the CIA, Afghanistan and Bin Laden. Robert Siegel talks with Coll, former managing editor of The Washington Post.
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Sep 15, 2004 — In a series of essays, commentator Steve Coll reflects on how terrorism binds voters in America, Afghanistan and Pakistan. His new book Ghost Wars chronicles the CIA's covert history in Afghanistan and Osama bin Laden's rise.
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Mar 31, 2005 — The new play Doubt opens on Broadway. It examines revelations about child molestation in the Catholic Church. Playwright John Patrick Shanley's own experience as a Catholic schoolboy lends an air of legitimacy to the story.
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Mar 25, 2005 — Robinson's first novel, Housekeeping, won a PEN/Hemingway Award. Now, 23 years later, her second novel, Gilead, has won the National Book Critics Circle Award. The book is written as a letter from a 76-year-old Congregationalist preacher to his 7-year-old son. This interview originally aired Feb. 8, 2005.
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Nov 23, 2004 — Alan Cheuse reviews Gilead by Marilynne Robinson, a novel narrated by a Christian minister as he nears death. Cheuse calls it a "beautifully ruminative novel."
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more The 2005 Pulitzer Prize Winners from NPR