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What you and I are reading this summer What titles have you been reading at the beach, or at the camp, or maybe on your Kindle in the back seat during that long day trip? Do you have any recommendations from the new releases section at your...
What does the massive popularity of e-books and e-readers mean for public libraries? Well, it’s complicated, but for North Country libraries, getting on the e-book train is apparently well worth the expense. In an Odgensburg Journal article...
This feels like “fun with books & writing” week. First, we can read Betsy Kepes’ fine updates on the Association of Writers and Writing Programs (AWP) Annual Conference happening in Seattle. But right now the Canadian...
Quick, when were heated seats invented? If you have that feature in your car, can you imagine living without it? Bonus Q: Are heated seats in the depths of winter cold about as good as sex? Credit writer Louise Penny for that quip. After a coming to...
Earlier this month Dale Hobson wrote about the National Toy Hall of Fame, including this year’s nominees. Judging from the response, many classic toys and games have staying power, in our minds if not in terms of sales at Christmas this year....


Books and Authors
Jul 31, 2014 — Anya Ulinich's new graphic novel is inspired by Bernard Malamud's "The Barrel" — both star choosy loners looking for love. But Malamud's swoony violins and lit candles don't apply to Lena Finkle.
Jul 31, 2014 — Also: a novel by Oscar Hijuelos will be published posthumously; Stephen Marche on the inevitability of literary failure.
Jul 31, 2014 — Yelena Akhtiorskaya's debut is a funny, sometimes heartbreaking, uniquely American chronicle of a family of Soviet immigrants who have transplanted a bit of their home to Brooklyn's Brighton Beach.

Special Features

Country Schoolhouse
Audio Play:
No Bigger Than a Piano Box: a North Country Schoolhouse in 1893
By historian Betsy Kepes. Based on the 1893 diary of a North Country schoolteacher. A Women's History Month special. Teacher's guide and CD available.
Irving Bachellor
Audio Novella:
A Franklin Manor Christmas
Paul Willcott of Saranac Lake reads his original Adirondack holiday story set in a down-at-heels former cure cottage and monastery occupied by a lonesome ex-professor.

BooksOther NCPR Literature Features:

Readers & Writers: Conversations on contemporary literature

Books & Literature Home page

Books Reviews

Author interviews

Recent Books: Recent regional books received at NCPR


Archaeologist pens new book on Fort William Henry

LAKE GEORGE, N.Y. (AP) The longtime leader of archaeological digs at upstate New York 18th-century military sites has a new book out that details decades of excavations at Lake George.

"The Legacy of Fort William Henry" by David Starbuck was published recently by University Press of New England.  Go to full article
Annie, Mary, and Sarah Brown, ca. 1851. Photo: Library of Congress<br />

Women and abolition the focus of lecture in Lake Placid on Saturday

The women in John Brown's family will be the focus of a lecture at the John Brown Day event in Lake Placid on Saturday. John Brown, the famous abolitionist, was convicted of treason and hanged for leading the raid on Harper's Ferry. He's buried on his family's farm in North Elba.

In 1849, he moved to a farm in the Adirondacks to lead freed slaves in farming. Each year, the non-profit organization, "John Brown Lives!" sponsors a series of lectures, workshops and a commemoration of John Brown's work to end slavery.

Todd Moe talks with historian Bonnie Laughlin-Schultz, who has written a book about the work of Mary, Brown's wife, and his daughters, Ruth and Annie, on behalf of the anti-slavery movement in the 19th century.

Laughlin-Schultz will lead a workshop for teachers on Saturday morning, and be part of a panel of historians talking about women and abolition. She's the author of the book, "The Tie That Bound Us: The Women of John Brown's Family and the Legacy of Radical Abolitionism."  Go to full article
A crowd of book-lovers, young and old, in the NCPR studio. Photo: Joel Hurd

Kids talk about "A Tale for the Time Being" by Ruth Ozeki

We have a bit of a tradition here at North Country Public Radio: book reviewer Betsy Kepes brings in a group of Canton H.S. students who have read and talked about a particular book to share their reactions with us.

On May 1, 2014, Betsy led a conversation about A Tale for the Time Being, by Ruth Ozeki, a Man Booker Prize finalist in fiction.

Narrated alternately by a teenage girl in Tokyo and a middle-aged writer living on an island off British Columbia, the book explores and connects the themes of time, culture, physics, zen, and bullying.  Go to full article
George Saunders. Photo via georgesaundersbooks.com

Author George Saunders at NCPR: weird fiction, writing, kindness

Writer George Saunders will be reading and talking about his work on the SUNY Canton campus as part of its Living Writers series...  Go to full article

Astrology book urges youngsters to look up at the night sky

A Canton author has written a new book exploring the basic fundamentals of the zodiac. "In the Night Sky" is a guide for young readers to understand the night sky, the...  Go to full article

Books: "Seven Locks" by Christine Wade

Imagine life in a Dutch village along the Hudson River in the years before the American Revolution. When a farm woman's husband disappears, how will her family survive as the...  Go to full article

"A Beautiful Truth" by Colin McAdam

In Colin McAdam's new novel, a childless couple in Addison County, Vermont buys a baby chimpanzee. At first he's a cute little guy, but what happens when an ape is raised as...  Go to full article
Jane MacNamara holds a copy of her book. Photo: Lucy Martin

Gene-o-rama: Tracking your family history through wills

All sorts of people dabble in documenting family history. Some with a stronger interest attend conferences, like one held this March in Ottawa. Organized by the local branch...  Go to full article

Listen: New Adirondack Treasure novel sets mystery, adventure on St. Lawrence

Cranberry Lake author Matthew Glavin loves a good mystery and a hunt for lost treasure. He and co-author Michael Dolan have released the second installment in the "Adirondack...  Go to full article

Book review: "White Bread: A Social History of the Store-bought Loaf"

What item fills up an aisle at most North Country grocery stores, a food so common we don't even see it? White bread, the All-American food. Betsy Kepes has this review of...  Go to full article

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