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“Navigable waters” is an awkward mouthful. Not a very sexy topic to the average layperson. But for some landowners and paddlers, them’s fighting words. Why? Because if a waterway is considered navigable, that comes with...
This summer, Paul Smith’s College and the East Shore Schroon Lake Association are working on a program aiming to control the spread of aquatic invasive species. Researchers are trying to see how effective it is to flush a boat’s...
Every so often some new sinkhole makes the news. This week the local hole worth knowing about opened up in West Quebec and closed Highway 148 between Luskville and Quyon. That got me poking around the Internet on the subject of sinkholes in...
Several converging experiences over the last week got me to thinking about the role predators play in the food chain and even, it turns out, on the shape of our landscape. It began with my hen house, led to the ridge at the top of my hay field, and...
This is the time of year when all manner of critters are out and about with their offspring. And most of us just go “Aww!” when the oh-so-cute babies go by. But it bears remembering that parents can be very protective. Wild or...

Environment
Jul 29, 2014 — Sardines and other small, oily fish are some of the most nutritious in the sea. Now there's another reason to eat them: Fishermen use a lot less fuel to catch them than many other kinds of seafood.
Jul 29, 2014 — Researchers found that a class of chemicals similar to nicotine and used on corn and soy farms has run off into streams and rivers in the Midwest. There they may be harming aquatic life, like insects.
Jul 29, 2014 — The White House says the cost of inaction outweighs the cost of implementing more-stringent regulations on greenhouse gas emissions.


Consumer Consequences from APM: What would the world look like if everyone lived like you?

Carp Barrier Clears Another Hurdle

Two federal agencies say they've worked out safety problems that might've caused delays at a new electric barrier designed to keep Asian carp out of the Great Lakes. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Chuck Quirmbach reports.  Go to full article

Tower Feud: Saratoga County & APA Square Off

The Adirondack Park Agency has worked hard to improve relations with local governments in the region. But last week, a dispute with Saratoga County erupted into public. Town and county officials hope to build three emergency broadcast towers on prominent mountain summits inside the Park. They've accused the Park Agency of delaying a project that's vital for public safety.
APA officials say the towers could do unnecessary harm to forests and scenic views. They say Saratoga County has been uncooperative and has refused to consider more environmentally-friendly technology. As Brian Mann reports, the feud could shape the APA's response to other government-sponsored projects.  Go to full article

Big Tupper Development Will Require Big Public Investment

The Adirondack Park Agency has begun its review of a massive new housing development in Tupper Lake. The proposal would mean more than eight hundred new condos and high-end vacation homes, built on a six-thousand acre parcel surrounding the Big Tupper Ski area. The development has broad support in Tupper Lake. But many locals still have questions about the project's financing. It appears that much of the infrastructure -- roads, sewers, and electrical lines -- will be built by state and local governments. As Brian Mann reports, local officials and the project's developers say taxpayers will be protected. But they've refused to say how much the public investment will cost.

CORRECTION: In Brian Mann's story on the Big Tupper development that aired December 24th, 2004, we reported that Tupper Lake resident Jim Ellis was working as a paid consultant for the project. The story mistakenly implied that Ellis had been hired by the project's developer, Preserve Associates. Jim Ellis works for the Adirondack North Country Association and as a consultant for the town and village. He has not received any compensation from Michael Foxman or the developers of Big Tupper. We apologize for the error.  Go to full article

Study: Air Pollution Affects Birth Weight

Cars, trucks and coal-fired power plants contribute to fine particle pollution, or soot. That type of pollution can be harmful for adults with heart or lung problems, and...  Go to full article

Looking Ahead to 2005's Great Lakes Issues

This coming year will likely see some major policy decisions regarding the Great Lakes. Because the lakes stretch out along eight states in the U.S. and two provinces in...  Go to full article

State Reaches Settlement on Lower Emissions for Coal Plants

The operators of six New York coal-fired power plants have agreed to slash nitrogen and sulfur emissions. Governor Pataki and state Attorney General Eliot Spitzer say the...  Go to full article

Birders' Passion Helps Scientists

Every year, tens of thousands of avid birdwatchers wander through frozen fields and marshy swamps. Their job is to record as many birds as they can find in a given area. ...  Go to full article

Open Burning Issue Smolders at Farmers' Conference

Last week in Syracuse farmers touted their environmental stewardship at the annual conference of the New York State Agricultural Society. Farmers presented new ways to build...  Go to full article

Two Perspectives on Open Burning

David Sommerstein talks at length with Assemblyman David Koon and the New York Farm Bureau's Patrick Hooker about the issue of open burning in the agricultural community.  Go to full article
Regulating District Manages Great Sacandaga Lake

Troubled North Country River Agency Loses Board Members

Governor Pataki says he wants to clean up the state's massive network of public corporations and authorities. But a north country agency that manages many of the region's...  Go to full article

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