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“Navigable waters” is an awkward mouthful. Not a very sexy topic to the average layperson. But for some landowners and paddlers, them’s fighting words. Why? Because if a waterway is considered navigable, that comes with...
This summer, Paul Smith’s College and the East Shore Schroon Lake Association are working on a program aiming to control the spread of aquatic invasive species. Researchers are trying to see how effective it is to flush a boat’s...
Every so often some new sinkhole makes the news. This week the local hole worth knowing about opened up in West Quebec and closed Highway 148 between Luskville and Quyon. That got me poking around the Internet on the subject of sinkholes in...
Several converging experiences over the last week got me to thinking about the role predators play in the food chain and even, it turns out, on the shape of our landscape. It began with my hen house, led to the ridge at the top of my hay field, and...
This is the time of year when all manner of critters are out and about with their offspring. And most of us just go “Aww!” when the oh-so-cute babies go by. But it bears remembering that parents can be very protective. Wild or...

Environment
Jul 28, 2014 — Central American coffee farmers are facing off against a deadly fungus that has wiped out thousands of acres of crops. Coffee companies like Starbucks are pooling money to support them in the fight.
Jul 28, 2014 — To withstand their 9,300-mile migration, red knots feast on eggs from horseshoe crabs each spring in Delaware Bay. Scientists worry many crabs are starting to lay eggs before the birds can get there.
Jul 26, 2014 — A report from the National Hockey League says climate change could threaten the sport's future. NPR's Scott Simon talks to NHL commissioner Gary Bettman about the league's sustainability plan.


Consumer Consequences from APM: What would the world look like if everyone lived like you?
Adirondack Forest Preserve Land?
Adirondack Forest Preserve Land?

Critics Say Land Lease on Adirondack Lake Violates NY Constitution

Every year, New York state leases thousands of parcels of land along the shore of Great Sacandaga Lake, in the southern Adirondacks. People pay an average of a hundred dollars a year for exclusive permits. They use the state land for their docks, their patios and even their front lawns. The popular program stretches back more than seventy years to the time when the reservoir was created. But environmentalists worry that rapid development is harming the lake's public shoreline and limiting recreation. Some legal experts also argue that the permit system violates the "forever wild" clause of New York's constitution. As Brian Mann reports, that clause bans the lease of state land inside the Adirondack Park.  Go to full article
State land extends from water to house.

On Great Sacandaga Lake, State Land For Lease Cheap

Real estate prices in the Adirondacks have soared in recent years, thanks to a boom in vacation home sales. Small parcels on a scenic lake often sell for hundreds of thousands of dollars.
     But along the shore of Great Sacandaga Lake, in the southern Adirondacks, people are able to lease hundred-foot sections of shoreline property directly from New York state for just fifty-six dollars a year. As Brian Mann reports, the permit program lies at the center of a growing controversy, which includes a lawsuit filed by Niagara Mohawk and an audit launched by the state Comptroller's office.  Go to full article

Great Sacandaga Lake Backgrounder

Martha Foley talks with Brian Mann to get some background about Great Sacandaga Lake and its history.  Go to full article

EPA Report: Mercury Contamination Widespread

More and more Americans are being warned that the local fish they eat could be contaminated with mercury and other toxins, according to a new report by the U.S. Environmental...  Go to full article

High Lake Levels Boon for Shipping

Water levels on the Great Lakes have come up this summer, thanks to the wet conditions. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Mike Simonson has more.  Go to full article

Lake Ontario to Cool Toronto

The city of Toronto is using the deep, chilly waters of Lake Ontario as "green" air conditioning for some of its skyscrapers. David Sommerstein explains how.  Go to full article
CP Rail Tower In Whallonsburg

CP Rail Drops APA Tower Suit, Council Claims DOT Funded Work

A Canadian corporation that sued the Adirondack Park Agency last month has withdrawn the suit. Canadian Pacific Rail still hopes to build a series of broadcast towers in the...  Go to full article

Out of Gas: The End of the Age of Oil

Martha Foley talks with Dr. David Goodstein. Goodstein is vice provost and professor of physics and technology at Caltech. He predicts we'll run out of oil very soon --...  Go to full article
Swain, after a recent training swim in Lake Champlain

Vermont Man to Swim Lake Champlain

A Vermont man who recently finished an eight-week swim down the Hudson River plans to swim the length of Lake Champlain. Christopher Swain plans to start the 125-mile trip...  Go to full article

Biologists Find Deer Devouring Rare Flowers

Most of us think of the white-tailed deer as a graceful and cherished part of the natural scene. But it turns out when there are too many deer, it's bad for some of the...  Go to full article

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