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“Navigable waters” is an awkward mouthful. Not a very sexy topic to the average layperson. But for some landowners and paddlers, them’s fighting words. Why? Because if a waterway is considered navigable, that comes with...
This summer, Paul Smith’s College and the East Shore Schroon Lake Association are working on a program aiming to control the spread of aquatic invasive species. Researchers are trying to see how effective it is to flush a boat’s...
Every so often some new sinkhole makes the news. This week the local hole worth knowing about opened up in West Quebec and closed Highway 148 between Luskville and Quyon. That got me poking around the Internet on the subject of sinkholes in...
Several converging experiences over the last week got me to thinking about the role predators play in the food chain and even, it turns out, on the shape of our landscape. It began with my hen house, led to the ridge at the top of my hay field, and...
This is the time of year when all manner of critters are out and about with their offspring. And most of us just go “Aww!” when the oh-so-cute babies go by. But it bears remembering that parents can be very protective. Wild or...

Environment
Jul 24, 2014 — So much of the food we eat these days is encased in plastic. And behind it is a whole lot of research and innovation. We dive into some of the materials that keep food fresh and portable.
Jul 23, 2014 — Operators of the Turkey Point nuclear plant near Miami have received federal permission to run their cooling system above the old 100 degree limit. The decision is meant to combat algae growth and rising temperature in cooling canals, but environmental groups in nearby Biscayne National Park are concerned.
Jul 23, 2014 — Dog owners don't doubt that their pooch has feelings. But scientists aren't so sure. An experiment found that dogs act upset, dare we say jealous, when their owners ignore them for a stuffed animal.


Consumer Consequences from APM: What would the world look like if everyone lived like you?
Ross Whaley
Ross Whaley

APA Chair Ross Whaley: Everyday Challenges, Future Visions

Ross Whaley came to the Adirondack Park Agency last September from the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry in Syracuse. He was president at ESF for 16 years, and then was University Professor. As Professor, his interest was the political economy of sustainable development. As chairman of the Park Agency, that's still where his interest lies. But it's now focused on the 6 million-acre park, where he sees the potential for a model of environmental and economic symbiosis. Realizing the vision is largely in the future. Whaley told Martha Foley his first year has been taken up with learning the ropes, and responding to challenges he's inherited from the first 30 years of APA history.  Go to full article

Who Gets Great Lakes Water?

More cities and businesses outside the Great Lakes basin want to take water from the lakes. Great Lakes governors and provincial premiers announced proposed new rules this week that would control such water diversions. Some say there's a chance communities JUST outside the basin will get a break. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Chuck Quirmbach reports on one such case.  Go to full article
Purple Loosestrife

Looking to the Environment Beyond the Garden

Invasive species are a growing problem in the north country. From purple loosestrife to Eurasian watermilfoil, alien plants are reshaping the region's environment. Gardeners and fish tank owners have introduced many of the worst species, bringing them in as decorative plants. But as Brian Mann reports, some gardeners are working to educate themselves--and to fight for a tougher response to invasives.  Go to full article
Debbie Braeu's nursery and landscaping business sells native water lilies. They  encourage buying only native plants for water gardens. (Photo by Chris Julin)

Water Gardens a Route for New Invasives

You can hear frogs croaking and chirping in the middle of a city these days. You can see cattails and water lilies out your window even if you live nowhere near a lake. ...  Go to full article
Filmmaker Matt Heineman in his preferred form of transportation

"Rolling on the River" in a St. Lawrence Skiff

Summer in the Thousand Islands is filled with the sound of boats. The throaty rumble of a Gar Wood run-about, the roar of a cigarette boat, the throbbing diesels of a Seaway...  Go to full article

Hunters and Anglers Disagree With Bush Policies

A group that generally considers itself to be conservative disagrees with many of the Bush administration's policies on the environment. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's...  Go to full article
An 8 week old bald eagle. Samples of feathers and blood are taken to check the bird's health. (Photo by Bob Kelleher)

Eagle Soaring Off Endangered Species List

The American Bald Eagle is expected to come off the endangered species list soon. Once a victim of hunting and pollution, the eagles are rebounding, but scientists say...  Go to full article
Photo by Nina Schoch

Annual Loon Census Begins Saturday Morning

This year's census of loons on lakes in and around the Adirondacks is Saturday morning. Volunteer observers are needed to record the number of adult loons, chicks, and...  Go to full article

New Fish Advisories in Adirondacks

The state health department yesterday issued new fish advisories for 10 Adirondack lakes and ponds due to mercury contamination. 20 other lakes and ponds in the park already...  Go to full article

To Bag or Not to Bag Grass Clippings

At one point or another, most of us have had to do yard work. If it was one of your chores as a kid, you probably developed a strong aversion to it. But as we settle into...  Go to full article

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