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“Navigable waters” is an awkward mouthful. Not a very sexy topic to the average layperson. But for some landowners and paddlers, them’s fighting words. Why? Because if a waterway is considered navigable, that comes with...
This summer, Paul Smith’s College and the East Shore Schroon Lake Association are working on a program aiming to control the spread of aquatic invasive species. Researchers are trying to see how effective it is to flush a boat’s...
Every so often some new sinkhole makes the news. This week the local hole worth knowing about opened up in West Quebec and closed Highway 148 between Luskville and Quyon. That got me poking around the Internet on the subject of sinkholes in...
Several converging experiences over the last week got me to thinking about the role predators play in the food chain and even, it turns out, on the shape of our landscape. It began with my hen house, led to the ridge at the top of my hay field, and...
This is the time of year when all manner of critters are out and about with their offspring. And most of us just go “Aww!” when the oh-so-cute babies go by. But it bears remembering that parents can be very protective. Wild or...

Environment
Jul 30, 2014 — Author Christiane Dorion distills complex scientific concepts into bite-sized explanations. "You can teach anything to children if you pitch it at the right level and use the right words," she says.
Jul 30, 2014 — Scientists are trying to raise prized bluefin tuna completely in captivity. An experiment at a Baltimore university is the first successful attempt in North America.
Jul 29, 2014 — Sardines and other small, oily fish are some of the most nutritious in the sea. Now there's another reason to eat them: Fishermen use a lot less fuel to catch them than many other kinds of seafood.


Consumer Consequences from APM: What would the world look like if everyone lived like you?

Cormorant Control Spreads West

Cormorants are large, fish-eating birds. They were nearly wiped out by the now-banned pesticide DDT. They began to colonize Little Galloo Island on the eastern end of Lake Onratio in the early 1970s. Their populations have flourished - too much so for commercial and recreational fishermen. New York's Department of Environmental Conservation has been studying cormorants' diets and habits since the 80s. They began shooting cormorants to control the growing population in the mid-90s. Now, eggs are oiled and nests destroyed every spring, and some birds are shot by DEC personnel. New York began working on cormorant control with other states along the Great Lakes in the mid-90s, as the birds continued to expand their reach. The Great lakes radio Consortium's Stephanie Hemphill explores one lake Superior community's experiment in cormorant control.  Go to full article

New Life For Old Running Shoes

Runners often wonder what to do with their shoes once the treads have worn too low to give enough foot support. People who have donated old shoes to charities or thrown them away have a new option now... a "sneaker recycling program." As part of an ongoing series called "Your Choice; Your Planet," the Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Skye Rohde reports.  Go to full article

Power Plants Top Polluters in North America

North America's environmental watchdog agency created by NAFTA has released its annual report on industrial pollution. It's called Taking Stock. The Commission for Environmental Cooperation looked at chemical releases by companies in 2001, the latest data available. David Sommerstein spoke with William Kennedy, the commission's executive director, about the report. Kennedy says the most important finding is that electric power plants were the worst air polluters in North America in 2001.  Go to full article

Hotter, Drier Climate in Region's Future?

A new study predicts that water levels in the Great Lakes could drop significantly over the next 50 years. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Karen Kelly reports.  Go to full article
Christopher Swain hopes to complete his Hudson River swim by July 28th

Environmentalist Begins Swim of the Hudson

Last Thursday, Christopher Swain dove into Lake Tear of the Clouds, the highest source of the Hudson River on Mount Marcy. Over the next eight weeks Swain will swim the...  Go to full article

Scientists Watch Farm Pastures for a New Tent Caterpillar Threat

Rising populations of the coming eastern tent caterpillar this year may be a danger to horses and cows in the North Country. Steve Van Der Mark is the point person on this...  Go to full article

Clayton to Host Seaway Study Meeting

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is three years into a comprehensive look at the present and future of the massive St. Lawrence Seaway, a 45 year old engineering marvel. The...  Go to full article

Big Bucks Spent to Fight NY's Bottle Bill

Advocates for an expanded bottle bill in Albany say they think they know why the measure can't pass in the legislature, despite widespread public support. They say the key is...  Go to full article

Report: Humans Contaminated by Pesticides

A new report finds the average person carries pesticide residue in their body that exceeds government-approved levels. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Karen Kelly reports.  Go to full article

Tent Caterpillars on the Rise

It's always something, it seems. This year, it's cicadas to the south, and it's tent caterpillars here in the north. Tent caterpillars are nothing new, their silky nests are...  Go to full article

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