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“Navigable waters” is an awkward mouthful. Not a very sexy topic to the average layperson. But for some landowners and paddlers, them’s fighting words. Why? Because if a waterway is considered navigable, that comes with...
This summer, Paul Smith’s College and the East Shore Schroon Lake Association are working on a program aiming to control the spread of aquatic invasive species. Researchers are trying to see how effective it is to flush a boat’s...
Every so often some new sinkhole makes the news. This week the local hole worth knowing about opened up in West Quebec and closed Highway 148 between Luskville and Quyon. That got me poking around the Internet on the subject of sinkholes in...
Several converging experiences over the last week got me to thinking about the role predators play in the food chain and even, it turns out, on the shape of our landscape. It began with my hen house, led to the ridge at the top of my hay field, and...
This is the time of year when all manner of critters are out and about with their offspring. And most of us just go “Aww!” when the oh-so-cute babies go by. But it bears remembering that parents can be very protective. Wild or...

Environment
Jul 23, 2014 — Dog owners don't doubt that their pooch has feelings. But scientists aren't so sure. An experiment found that dogs act upset, dare we say jealous, when their owners ignore them for a stuffed animal.
Jul 22, 2014 — South Portland, Maine, has blocked crude oil from being loaded onto ships at its port. Environmentalists are cheering, but the Portland Montreal Pipeline Corp. says the ban won't hold up in court.
Jul 22, 2014 — A plant in Tonawanda heats coal into material for the iron and steel industries, releasing toxic chemicals into the air. Residents have long blamed the pollution for several health problems.


Consumer Consequences from APM: What would the world look like if everyone lived like you?

Study: Kids Eating Organics Have Lower Pesticide Exposure

A new study published in the Journal of the National Institutes of Environmental Health Science finds that children who eat organically grown fruits and vegetables appear to have less exposure to pesticides. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Mark Urycki has details.  Go to full article

Region Deals with Deadly Nerve Agent

The Army wants to get rid of its stockpiles of chemical weapons because they fear terrorists might get to them. There are eight Army sites across the U.S. that store those kinds of chemicals. At one site in the Great Lakes region, the military is planning to dispose of Nerve Agent VX. To destroy the stockpiles, the Army must first "water-down" the nerve agent. Then it has to be shipped to a company that disposes of industrial wastes. But while the Army says it's making neighborhoods safer near where the chemical weapons are stored, some people fear having the watered-down nerve agent trucked into their neighborhoods. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Natalie Walston reports.  Go to full article

Encouraging Farmers to Enter Alternative Crop Market

New York lawmakers are looking at possible incentives to help farmers expand into the lucrative alternative crop market. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Joyce Kryszak has details.  Go to full article

Corps Backs Off Seaway Expansion

A study of the St. Lawrence Seaway is pulling back from expanding locks and channels for bigger ships. Instead, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is going to research more...  Go to full article

DEC Hosts Discussion of Grass River Unit Management Plan

The Department of Environmental Conservation is holding an open house tonight to talk about the Grass River unit management plan. Jody Tosti has more.  Go to full article

Modified Crops Swap Genes With Weeds

Genetically modified crops are planted throughout the Midwest. But some scientists are concerned genes from these crops could escape and work their way into weedy plants. ...  Go to full article

Seaway Expansion: Spotlight on Canada

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers wants to move ahead on a 20 million dollar study of Seaway expansion. Shippers and ports say it's needed. Environmentalists say it could...  Go to full article

Invasives Leave Parasites Behind

Plants and animals that come from overseas sometimes out-compete species that are native to the region. Scientists have long debated what makes the invaders so successful. ...  Go to full article

New Limits on Pesticides in Drinking Water?

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is reviewing how much of a commonly used pesticide it will allow in drinking water. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Lester Graham...  Go to full article

McHugh: Seaway Study "Inappropriate"

The spending bill passed by Congress late last week includes 1.5 million dollars for the Army Corps of Engineers to continue its study of the St. Lawrence Seaway. The bill...  Go to full article

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