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Gardening
Jul 9, 2014 — If you always end up killing your house plants, this week's innovation pick may help. This new microfarming appliance grows produce indoors with just seeds, an electrical outlet and a little water.
Dec 16, 2013 — A woman in Miami Shores, Fla., is suing her town after it forced her to remove vegetables from the garden in her front yard, which she had tended for 17 years. She's being backed by a a national public interest law firm, but the town says it's a long-standing zoning ordinance that won't be overturned.
Oct 29, 2013 — Older people who are active every day appear to lower their risk of heart disease and death by almost a third, even if they're not doing the kind of exercise that breaks a sweat. Gardening and puttering around the house qualify. And don't overlook berry-picking, a popular pastime in Sweden, where the study was done.
Jul 12, 2013 — Earlier this week we told you about people who want to see micro-gardening go big. We've chosen a few of our favorite images of micro-gardens from around the country that make the most of small spaces and idle containers.
Jul 9, 2013 — Micro-gardens are small spaces, such as balconies, patios and rooftops, cultivated with planting containers like wooden boxes and trash cans. Now, creative reuse of old materials and some new tools for sale are making it easier for urban dwellers to stretch their green thumbs.
 

Gardening Links

Amy Ivy
Cooperative Extension horticulturist Amy Ivy
Garden Rant
Encyclopedic Guide to Northeastern Weed Species on CD-ROM: Cornell Weed Ecology

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Local Flavors: Todd Moe keeps it homegrown in this series focused on eating locally, and on sustainable agriculture and gardening.
<em>Popillia japonica</em>, commonly known as the Japanese beetle. Photo: <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_beetle#mediaviewer/File:Popillia_japonica.jpg">Bruce Marlin</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Popillia japonica, commonly known as the Japanese beetle. Photo: Bruce Marlin, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Japanese beetles!!? What to do!?

Japanese beetles own a particular place in the gardener's journal. They are destructive. They come en masse. They are very hard to get rid of. So they are in that group of insect pests that is at the top of the dreaded-scourges list.

And this year, they are in Cooperative Extension horticulturist Amy Ivy's garden: her willows, her marigolds, her corn. Everywhere. So she shares her advice on what to do about them with particular feeling.  Go to full article
Healthy porcelain garlic, after a successful growing season..

How to harvest and keep garlic

Garlic is easy to plant, and doesn't usually require a whole lot of attention as it grows. It comes up, nice and green, first thing in the spring, like daffodils. Timing the harvest is trickier, though. And treating it right can help keep the bulbs fresh and firm for months.

Cooperative Extension's Amy Ivy has the do's and don'ts.  Go to full article
Artist Wayne Brown, Barbara Beekman, and Cindy Quakenbush install the new sculpture in the Butterfly Garden. Photo: Natalie Dignam.

Butterfly garden blooming with new additions

Ripe berries and growing tomatoes may be the focus for most gardeners right now, but last week a different kind of flower bloomed in the garden outside of the NCPR in Canton.

A new sculpture stands about eight feet tall among the fragrant perennials in the EJ Noble medical Building's butterfly garden. It's topped with a yellow flower and a big, iron butterfly.

The garden has a small waterfall and is even in the shape of a butterfly. NCPR summer intern Natalie Dignam met with the creator of the garden, Cindy Quackenbush, and Barbara Beekman, who commissioned the new sculpture.  Go to full article
Phosphorus used in gardens can contribute to algae blooms in lakes, like this one in 2012. Photo: Lake George Waterkeeper

For lawn and garden: the do's and don'ts of fertilizing

It's illegal to fertilize a lawn with phosporous in New York State. The Department of Environmental Conservation sent a press release around last week with that reminder...  Go to full article
Invasive wild parsnip. Avoid contact; avoid a nasty rash. Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/dmills727/3644070846/">Douglas Mills</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Beware the invasives; and small strawberries are good too!

Right about now, the roadsides can look more like flower gardens than some gardens do. Wonderful abundant mixes of color, texture, height: all the qualities you look for....  Go to full article
Several types of hanging basket. Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/ken_yasuhara/6116652111/">K. Yasahura</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

How to keep flower boxes and baskets looking their best

It's hard for a gardener to complain about this stone-summer weather. Heat, sun, plus a little rain here and there are a great combination to kick plants into high gear for...  Go to full article
Tomato plants starting up a trellis. Photo: <a href="https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3648/3650652836_ca568ea7e6_o_d.jpg">Charles Dawley</a>, Creative Common, some rights reserved

Some tomato tips before the season kicks into high gear

Even if you don't have a garden, you can grow tomatoes in a sunny spot on your front steps or patio. They're one of the most popular vegetables. But they take some...  Go to full article
Rose chafer beetles at work. Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/50352333@N06/4647992672/">Jason Sturner</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

First the blooms, then the bugs

Aren't the peonies lovely? And the first roses to bloom so pretty and fragrant? Along with the iris and the first day lilies, they give gardeners an early-summer shot of...  Go to full article
After removing the early weeds, mulching between rows will slow their return. Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/90738513@N00/2522983940">Linda Beaverson</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Weeds, you say? Get 'em when they're little

The tiniest weeds might just be you're most important job right now. It's like the old "pound of prevention" saying. You can deal with a million weeds in a very short time,...  Go to full article
Part way done: some perennials back in place, soil amendment continues. Photo by Martha Foley

Out with the bad: taking control of the perennial garden

The first step can be the hardest when you've got a major Quackgrass infestation, or an "aggressive" perennial that's taking over. In Martha Foley's garden this spring, it...  Go to full article

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