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Native American news from Indian Country Today, a continent-wide news service of Four Directions Media

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More Native American news from indianz.com, a continental news service based on the Winnebago Reservation in Nebraska and with offices in Washington, DC

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Native American News
Jul 27, 2014 — For Native American students, getting ready for college can be thrilling, alienating, and downright infuriating.
Jul 19, 2014 — There are about 100,000 native Kenyans living in America, clustered in Boston, Atlanta, Washington D.C., Dallas and parts of the West Coast. How do they stay connected? A radio station.
Jun 24, 2014 — Aaron Carapella couldn't find a map showing the original names and locations of Native American tribes as they existed before contact with Europeans. That's why the Oklahoma man designed his own map.
Jun 17, 2014 — What causes deadly twisters? The Native Americans of Oklahoma offered one answer.
Jun 16, 2014 — President Obama is promoting new initiatives to improve education for Native American students. Ahniwake Rose, executive director of the National Indian Education Association, has the details.
 

Special Reports

native ballplayer
Audio Slideshow:
Native Americans in baseball's past & present
David Sommerstein visits a new exhibit at the Iroqoius Museum celebrating ball players who were Native American.
Audio Series
Hydo Power in Cree Country
Brian Mann looks at hydro-electric development in Cree country in northern Quebec, where the desire for carbon-neutral energy resources comes into conflict with aboriginal rights, spiritual practice, and wilderness preservation.
Hotinonshonni art
Audio Slideshow:
Following in the Footsteps of Our Ancestors: An Exhibition of Hotinonshonni Contemporary Art
An exhibit at the Brush Art Gallery at St. Lawrence University explores the past, present, and future of the Iroquois Confederacy through the eyes of its members.
Audio Slideshow
High Steel" Prowess at Ironworker Festival
Mohawks and other Native Americans have built the world's most famous buildings and bridges, including the Empire State Building and the World Trade Center. They work the "high steel," a dangerous profession practiced high above the ground. The skill and craft of ironworking took center stage last month near Syracuse in a sort of ironworker olympics.

Ken Parker with a Kentucky coffeetree, native to the Seneca territory. Photo provded by Ken Parker.
Ken Parker with a Kentucky coffeetree, native to the Seneca territory. Photo provded by Ken Parker.

Seneca Nation commits to native plant landscaping

The Seneca Nation in western New York has a new policy regarding landscaping on tribal government property. It's committing to native plants only.

"All our future plantings in our public buildings around the territory we will commit to local, indigenous plants of western New York, plants important to the Seneca people," says Ken Parker, horticultural consultant for the Seneca Nation. "And we will no longer plant and introduce to the territory Eurasian plant species."

Parker has been in the nursery business for 25 years. After living in Canada for a while, he returned to Seneca territory and wondered why there were Norway maples instead of sugar maples. He also questioned at a Nation meeting why a new traffic circle was being landscaped with Dutch bulbs.  Go to full article
Flag of the Seneca Nation. Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/jeromeg111/7653905792">JeromeG111</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Woman announces run for Seneca Nation presidency

SALAMANCA, N.Y. (AP) A Seneca Nation Council member is running to become the first female president of the western New York tribe.

Darlene Miller announced her candidacy on Monday, saying she wants to unify the divided Seneca Nation and get back to traditional ways and values.

The election is Nov. 4.  Go to full article
A map of the Mohawk land claim.

Franklin County has the next move in Mohawk land claim deal

A federal appeals board has ruled the St. Regis Mohawk Tribe can make 39 acres of land it owns part of the Akwesasne reservation.

The tribe has used the land as a garbage transfer station for more than a decade. But it's technically within the borders of Franklin County, just west of the town of Fort Covington. The tribe originally petitioned to have the parcel added to the reservation seven years ago.

The details of the transfer will remain unclear until Franklin County decides what to do about a proposed settlement to the larger Mohawk land claim. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article
Henry Jake Arquette. Photo courtesy TAUNY Archives/Martha Cooper

Mohawk basketmaker receives highest NEA honor

Mohawk basket maker Henry Jake Arquette has won the nation's highest honor in the folk and traditional...  Go to full article
Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mackvilleroad/4160483304/">Diane</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Vermont promotes state's Abenaki heritage

MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) The state of Vermont is promoting the state's Abenaki heritage.

This summer the Department of Tourism and Marketing is working with Abenaki...  Go to full article
St. Regis Mohawk chiefs Ron LaFrance, Beverly Cook, and sub-chief Eric Thompson are hoping to build support for the land claim settlement among tribal members. Photo: David Sommerstein.

Mohawk chiefs: "The most important thing is our land"

Mohawks in Akwesasne are trying to absorb the terms of a deal to end their historic land claim.

Last week, tribal chiefs signed a framework agreement with New York...  Go to full article
Governor Cuomo with county and tribal leaders signing the land claim MOU Wednesday in Albany. Photo provided by St. Regis Mohawk Tribe

Mohawks, St. Lawrence Co. reach deal on land claim

Wednesday in Albany, tribal chiefs and St. Lawrence County officials joined Gov. Andrew Cuomo to sign a memorandum of understanding to resolve the more than three-decades old...  Go to full article

Book Review: "Short Nights of the Shadow Catcher" by Timothy Egan

You don't have to be a westerner to appreciate Edward Curtis's photos from a hundred years ago. His sepia prints show native people on horseback or in dugout canoes. His...  Go to full article
1929 historical plaque commemorating the two continental army generals who led the campaign against the Iroquois. Photo: Brain Adler, released to public domaon

Military museum slates program on Iroquois battle

SARATOGA SPRINGS, N.Y. (AP) The American offensive against the Iroquois Confederacy in western New York during the Revolutionary War is the subject of an upcoming program at...  Go to full article
Million Dollar Beach, Lake George, NY. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/plastiks-romance/8217100899/">Pamela Boudreau</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Artifacts from Lake George dig going on display

LAKE GEORGE, N.Y. (AP) Some of the thousands of artifacts uncovered during an archaeological dig in the southern Adirondacks are going on display this summer.
...  Go to full article

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