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Native American news from Indian Country Today, a continent-wide news service of Four Directions Media

Nations of the Northeast

More Native American news from indianz.com, a continental news service based on the Winnebago Reservation in Nebraska and with offices in Washington, DC

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Apr 6, 2014 — The FBI has seized thousands of Native American and cultural artifacts from the home of a southern Indiana man. Among the items are arrowheads, gas masks, even a full skeleton. Investigators say the man may have violated international treaties and federal and state laws when he bought the items.
Apr 3, 2014 — The collection of items has "immeasurable" cultural value, the FBI says. Some artifacts are Native American; others are Russian and Chinese. It's unclear how many were collected legally.
Mar 21, 2014 — A U.S. Education Department report finds what it calls a pattern of punitive policies and educational neglect that disproportionately hurt black, Latino and Native American students in public schools.
Nov 21, 2013 — Native American leaders from across the country gathered at the White House recently for the fifth annual tribal summit. Guest host Celeste Headlee speaks with Brian Cladoosby, the newly elected president of the National Congress of American Indians, about the top issues in Indian country.
Oct 9, 2013 — Native American tribes often rely on their relationship with federal agencies to keep themselves afloat. Host Michel Martin speaks with Tara Gatewood, host of the public radio show Native America Today, about how the government shutdown affects Native Americans. NPR Senior Business Editor Marilyn Geewax also joins the conversation.
 

Special Reports

native ballplayer
Audio Slideshow:
Native Americans in baseball's past & present
David Sommerstein visits a new exhibit at the Iroqoius Museum celebrating ball players who were Native American.
Audio Series
Hydo Power in Cree Country
Brian Mann looks at hydro-electric development in Cree country in northern Quebec, where the desire for carbon-neutral energy resources comes into conflict with aboriginal rights, spiritual practice, and wilderness preservation.
Hotinonshonni art
Audio Slideshow:
Following in the Footsteps of Our Ancestors: An Exhibition of Hotinonshonni Contemporary Art
An exhibit at the Brush Art Gallery at St. Lawrence University explores the past, present, and future of the Iroquois Confederacy through the eyes of its members.
Audio Slideshow
High Steel" Prowess at Ironworker Festival
Mohawks and other Native Americans have built the world's most famous buildings and bridges, including the Empire State Building and the World Trade Center. They work the "high steel," a dangerous profession practiced high above the ground. The skill and craft of ironworking took center stage last month near Syracuse in a sort of ironworker olympics.

Jose Kusugak, Inuit Tapirisat: From Snow Age to Space Age

The Inuit people populate a huge swath of land from Alaska in the West, across Canada to the Atlantic Ocean, and East to Greenland. Despite the broad territory, they speak a common language, Inuktitut. In 1993, over twenty years of land claims with the Canadian Government resulted in new territories and self-government for the Inuit. A new province called "Nunavut", located north of Ontario and Quebec, joined Canada in 1999. St. Lawrence University is featuring Inuit and Nunavut Culture as the theme for this year's Festival of the Arts. Jose Kusugak, president of the Inuit Tapirisat, the advocacy organization for the Inuit in Canadian government, visited Canton to kick off the festival. When the land claim movement began in the early '70s, Kusugak was travelling the Inuit territories to learn more about the various dialects in the Inuit language. He discovered that people in the isolated towns he visited didn't understand the purpose of the land claims. He told David Sommerstein that he needed to shift his mission to teach the political implications of the talks with the Canadian government.

St. Lawrence University's Festival of the Arts is called "From Nanook to Nunavut: The art and politics of representing Inuit culture" Presentations of Inuit art, literature, music, and dance will run through March 7.  Go to full article

Meet the Masters: Ray Fadden, Mohawk Elder, Onchiota

In the 1940s, Ray Fadden [Tehanetorens] began to teach young Mohawks about their own culture. With a group of young men from the reservation, he traveled to collect information about Mohawk history and trained them in woodsmanship and other traditional arts. Fadden later founded the Six Nations Indian Museum in Onchiota, where an impressive collection of historical Iroquois artifacts are exhibited.  Go to full article

Meet the Masters: Mohawk Choir of St. Regis

Catholicism has its roots deeps in the history of Akwesasne, the St. Regis Mohawk reservation straddling the St. Lawrence River between the US and Canada, going back to the French Jesuit mission established there in the 1750s. The church choir there preserves a unique tradition of Christian music sung in the Mohawk language, and acts as a bridge between two often discordant cultural traditions.  Go to full article

Meet the Masters: Akwesasne Basketmakers

The traditional basketmakers of the Mohawk nation at Akwesasne are known for fine ash splint and sweetgrass work. Some travel to colleges, museums and international pow-wows...  Go to full article

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