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Jul 29, 2014 — Two brothers rented a condo in Palm Springs and began claiming tenants' rights after 30 days, then threatened to sue the owner for negligence, claiming the tap water damaged their espresso machine.
Jul 29, 2014 — You can travel the world without opening your wallet — or your eyes. Sound Transit, a collaborative website, allows users to immerse themselves in the everyday sounds of faraway places.
Jul 29, 2014 — The taxi and hotel industries are pressuring Spain to crack down on popular "share economy" apps and websites. Airbnb was recently fined $40,000 for failing to list rentals with a local tourism board.
Jul 28, 2014 — In a deal that would have been unimaginable 20 years ago, Apple has announced a partnership with IBM. The two companies will work together on a new class of applications for iPads and iPhones.
Jul 28, 2014 — One-click online shopping is changing how we shop. Stores with leases as short as a day are proliferating — meaning a storefront can be a designer clothing store one day and a test kitchen the next.
 
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Curt Stager
An Independent Blog:
Save the Carbon
Naturalist Curt Stager, co-host of Natural Selections and author of Deep Future, shares long-term perspectives on environmental change, past, present, and future.

Natural Selections: Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager discuss

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Dragonflies and Damselfies
Todd Moe talks with investigators about how volunteers help study these colorful insects and their habitats. Photos by Vici & Steve Diehl.
The rusty blackbird may vanish from the Adirondacks. Photo: Larry Master, used with permission
The rusty blackbird may vanish from the Adirondacks. Photo: Larry Master, used with permission

Iconic Adirondack birds face sharp decline

A new study is raising alarm about the future of some of the Adirondack Park's most iconic birds. The report from the Wildlife Conservation Society's Adirondack Program found sharp decline among six bird species that live in the Park's boreal wetlands.

Michale Glennon is the group's science director and her study was published this month in the journal Northeastern Naturalist. Glennon told Brian Mann that some of these birds may eventually vanish from the North Country, pressured by habitat loss, pollution and climate change.  Go to full article
Robin Nagle, from Saranac Lake, is the anthropologist-in-residence in the New York City Sanitation Department.  Photo: Brian Mann

America's never-ending war against garbage

We've all had the experience of being told that it's our turn to take out the trash. Or sort the recycling. Or make the weekly trip to the dump.

More and more of us are trying to reduce the amount of waste we produce, by composting and buying stuff with less packaging.

But Americans still produce massive amounts of garbage.

And the way we deal with it shapes our lives and the future of our communities and our environment.  Go to full article
Doug Huntley, superintendent of Queensbury Union Free school district. Photo courtesy Doug Huntley

Should schools teach career-specific skills earlier?

Monday at St. Lawrence University, officials, educators and community leaders will gather for the 12th annual North Country Symposium. This year, the day-long conference will focus on sustaining the North Country's schools and ask how education can be more tightly woven into the fabric of North Country life.

One of the keynote speakers believes students need to begin pursuing the skills they'll need for a career earlier. Doug Huntley is superintendent of the Queensbury Union Free school district near Glens Falls, and a former superintendent of Massena Central schools.  Go to full article
Dr. Stephen Ledoux. Photo via <a href="http://www.canton.edu/news/index.php/2014/03/ledoux14/">SUNY Canton</a>

What's behaviorology and how can it help solve global problems?

SUNY Canton's Sustainability Lecture Series continues tonight with a talk about using behaviorology, the study of natural science explanations of behavior, to face global...  Go to full article
A mastodon skeleton on display at the American Museum of Natural History. Photo: <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Mammut_americanum.jpg">Ryan Somma</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Mastodon has new home at Cambridge NY school

CAMBRIDGE, N.Y. (AP) A mastodon that was on display at a New York college for 80 years and in storage for another 20 now has a new home at an upstate school.

Steve...  Go to full article
Can you see the octopus on the right? The picture was taken from the underwater camera called a yo yo cam. Photo: Glenn Clark

Parishville-Hopkinton teacher coming home from Antarctica

With the continuing cold weather here in the North Country, it might feel like we're in Antarctica, but Parishville-Hopkinton biology teacher Glenn Clark has one on us in...  Go to full article
Olympian Erin Hamlin (left) and Duncan Kennedy of the United States Luge Association work with Professor Doug Bohl, grad student Brian Heckendorf, and Professor Brian Helenbrook on sizing a sled so that they can model it electronically, and then manufacture it.  Photo: Clarkson University

Clarkson engineers designing a faster luge sled

The Sochi winter Olympics have wrapped up, but Clarkson University researchers are already working on the 2018 Winter Games: Mechanical engineering professor Doug Bohl uses...  Go to full article
Penguins heading for open water. Photo: Glenn Clark

Parishville-Hopkinton teacher studies climate change in Antarctica

Have you seen a whale, penguin or seal lately? Parishville-Hopkinton biology teacher Glenn Clark has: He's in Antarctica right now. Clark is one of 17 teachers selected from...  Go to full article
Crescent moon with Venus and Jupiter near. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/harshanm/3073301812/">harshanm</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Heads-up, star-gazers! Venus is back

Lots of news from St. Lawrence University astronomer Aileen O'Donoghue this morning. She stopped by the NCPR studios to share the monthly update with Martha Foley.
...  Go to full article
Jupiter and the four Galilean moons. From left: Europa, Jupiter, Io, Ganymede, Callisto. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/jpstanley/497884413/">Jeremy Stanley</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

News of the cosmos: perihelion, Jupiter's moons and more

In the deep, deep of winter, we've lost our view of Venus, but we're gaining daylight. St. Lawrence University astronomer Aileen O'Donoghue reminds Martha Foley of the good...  Go to full article

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