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Jul 26, 2014 — The roundup: Twitter released a scorecard showing that its workforce is largely male and white. And what happens to our digital stuff after we log off for the last time?
Jul 26, 2014 — When a grainy video of human rights abuse goes viral, how do you know it's real? NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Christoph Koettl, of the Citizen Evidence Lab, which helps users verify videos and photos.
Jul 25, 2014 — The bill also directs the Librarian of Congress to review whether the exemption should also apply to tablets and other devices.
Jul 25, 2014 — Some of us now monitor our steps, sleep and calorie intake with wristbands and apps. So why not track blood-alcohol levels? We explore the next frontier in the self-measurement movement.
Jul 24, 2014 — So much of the food we eat these days is encased in plastic. And behind it is a whole lot of research and innovation. We dive into some of the materials that keep food fresh and portable.
 
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Curt Stager
An Independent Blog:
Save the Carbon
Naturalist Curt Stager, co-host of Natural Selections and author of Deep Future, shares long-term perspectives on environmental change, past, present, and future.

Natural Selections: Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager discuss

Special Reports

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Audio Slideshow:
Dragonflies and Damselfies
Todd Moe talks with investigators about how volunteers help study these colorful insects and their habitats. Photos by Vici & Steve Diehl.
Crescent moon in twilight. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/jpstanley/423720850/">Jeremy Stanley</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Crescent moon in twilight. Photo: Jeremy Stanley, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Clear skies, longer nights offer great star-gazing

The days are getting shorter, by about three minutes every 24 hours now, and that's welcome news for Aileen O'Donoghue. It means more time for looking at the night sky.

O'Donoghue teaches physics, including astronomy, at St. Lawrence University, and stopped by the NCPR studios this morning to deliver an update on the current highlights in what she calls the wilderness above us.

She tells Martha Foley about Venus (hanging in the west at sundown), Saturn (nearby, but fainter and MUCH farther away), and the waning crescent, and Jupiter (both in the morning sky). And then there's the new crescent, coming Monday.  Go to full article
UW researcher Andrea Stocco during the experiment. Photo: University of Washington

Brain to brain communication, via the Internet

We've used the internet to connect computers. Now, how about using it to connect our brains? Researchers at the University of Washington have done just that in what they say is the first ever brain-to-brain interface.  Go to full article
Clarkson University undergraduate students, with Professor Tom Langen (third from left), look for golden winged warblers at Fish Creek State Wildlife Management Area in New York, on July 24, 2013. Photo: Julie Grant.

Ecology moves from the field to the screen

People who dream about being ecologists - and studying the environment for a living - might want to get comfortable sitting at a computer. More and more data are being collected and analyzed online, and that's changing what it means to be an ecologist.  Go to full article
Salt shaker. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/50388630@N00/2081320295/">pboyd04</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Natural Selections: Why we need salt

Besides making our food taste better, sodium chloride (salt) is necessary for our bodies to function. Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager whet their appetites on the science of...  Go to full article
Instructions for 'CrowdHydrology.' Photo: Ashley Hassett

Buffalo-based project crowdsources water level tracking

A nationwide project based in New York is using crowd sourcing to gather up-to-date information on water levels.

The program's a partnership between the US...  Go to full article
A salt formation at Queen Elizabeth National Park in Uganda. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/__piq/2064297906/sizes/z/in/photolist-49q4Rd-49kZNk-61hFYx-8nDhP8-8nDi3r-5oZn33-j3dK-9mtQJn-9zYDfq-ufiVB-4iv4TC-4ir13M-zUmTX-8ksEg8-dwDNQi-dG4ffo-4kcfAZ-4eAFb-9ABV55-4bxMaq-5mQaz2-9kVkEx-9kYo4S-9kYvdm-9kYrF7-99fghd-5tW8C3-5p5uct-a6pu9w-PNzYK-dG5EuG-2d2v2-8Hgj8V-7exijk-eadSEq-87LdgY-87Lcbh-87GYu6-4kVvaX-8nGsbA-5AFqsv-9kVp9v-87LctE/">notphilatall</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

What's the deal with salt?

It's a delicious flavor, for humans and deer alike...but it's also so much more.

There's just something special about salt, a naturally occurring mineral that...  Go to full article
Produced by the Canadian Museum of Nature and the University of Toronto Press, this 2012 publication includes art by Paul Geraghty, Julius Csotonyl and Brenda Carter along with photos from Canadian Geographic. French and e-book editions should be available soon.

Donna Naughton on "The Natural History of Canadian Mammals"

Donna Naughton has been fascinated by nature and natural science all her life.

She landed a job at the Canadian Museum of Natural Science almost by accident,...  Go to full article
An estimated 4 billion chestnut trees grew between Maine and Georgia, before they were wiped out by the blight, according to the American Chestnut Foundation. Today, they're estimated at fewer than 100 in their native range. Photo: Rajiv Narula

Heard Up North: Bringing a tree back to life

In the beginning of last century, a blight wiped out almost all of the chestnut trees, and today you're almost as likely to come across a unicorn as you are a fully grown,...  Go to full article
The Northern Grape Project's test vines at Coyote Moon winery, Clayton. Photo: David Sommerstein

North Country wines survive the cold, please the palate

The New York wine industry is booming. According to the New York Wind and Grape Foundation, five million people visit New York wineries every year. The industry generates...  Go to full article
Jupiter near the crescent moon last April. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/herbraab/7103650931/">H. Raab</a>, CC some rights reserved

Tracking the planets this spring

We're gaining about three minutes of daylight every day now, and the winter constellations such as Orion are starting to slip below the horizon. Jupiter will be the brightest...  Go to full article

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