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Jul 27, 2014 — The Harrier Jump Jet is known for vertical take-offs and landings. It also has an accident-prone track record, but that didn't dissuade one pilot from buying his dream plane.
Jul 27, 2014 — An experiment at a new production of Carmen has many wondering how technology will affect operagoers' experience. NPR's Arun Rath talks to Kim Witman, director of the Wolf Trap Opera.
Jul 26, 2014 — Linguists and native speakers around the world are turning to Facebook, Twitter and other sites to help pass indigenous, minority and endangered languages on to new generations.
Jul 26, 2014 — The roundup: Twitter released a scorecard showing that its workforce is largely male and white. And what happens to our digital stuff after we log off for the last time?
Jul 26, 2014 — When a grainy video of human rights abuse goes viral, how do you know it's real? NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Christoph Koettl, of the Citizen Evidence Lab, which helps users verify videos and photos.
 
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Naturalist Curt Stager, co-host of Natural Selections and author of Deep Future, shares long-term perspectives on environmental change, past, present, and future.

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Dragonflies and Damselfies
Todd Moe talks with investigators about how volunteers help study these colorful insects and their habitats. Photos by Vici & Steve Diehl.

Benefits and Risks of Cloned Cows

Milk production is big business in New York and the upper Midwest. Now the president of a biotech company in Wisconsin is milking a herd of cloned cows that he says could give the Great Lakes dairy industry a boost. But there are still questions about the health of cloned cows and whether the milk they produce is safe for human consumption. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Gil Halsted has the story.  Go to full article

Clarkson Receives $30-million Gift

Clarkson University has announced the largest gift in its history -- $30-million dollars to support engineering and science programs at the Potsdam school. Martha Foley reports.  Go to full article

Bill Moore: Building a Wind Farm on the Tug Hill Plateau

David Sommerstein talks with Bill Moore, founder and principal of Atlantic Renewable Energy Corporation, about the present and future of wind-generated electricity. Moore is designing and building a wind farm on the Tug Hill Plateau in Lewis County. He'll be speaking as a part of the North Country Sustainable Energy Fair this weekend.  Go to full article

PSC Studies Rural Telecommunications

A study of rural areas by the Public Service Commission will demonstrate ways to improve access to telecommunications in the North Country. State Senator Jim Wright says...  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Asteroids

Asteroids have left their mark on the earth and moon, but how big do they need to be in order to make it through the earth's atmosphere?  Go to full article

Stream Update

Watertown and Jefferson County officials are making preparations for Stream International's customer service center in hopes the company will decide to locate in the city. ...  Go to full article

Great Lakes Radio Consortium: Women Astronomers

Astronomy historically has been dominated by men, but women have left their mark over the years. A new planetarium show is trying to shine a little light on advances in...  Go to full article

APA Approves New Communications Tower Regulations

On Friday the Adirondack Park Agency approved a new policy that will guide construction of cell and broadcast towers in the mountains. Huge areas of the Park don't have cell...  Go to full article

Light Pollution: Taking Back the Night Sky

The invention of electric lights at the end of the 19th Century ended the ancient tyranny of darkness over our lives. Turning on the lights at night has allowed us to make...  Go to full article

Bacteria Could Power Environmental Monitoring Equipment

Bacteria that can eat pollution and generate electricity at the same time. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Lester Graham reports.  Go to full article

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