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NCPR News Staff: Brian Mann

Adirondack Bureau Chief
Brian Mann grew up in Alaska, where he fell in love with public radio. In 1999, Brian moved to the Adirondacks and helped launch NCPR's news bureau at Paul Smiths College. "I love the chemistry of water and mountains," Brian says. "But I'm also pretty crazy about village life in the north country. It's the kind of place where you know your neighbors." Brian lives in Saranac Lake with wife Susan and son Nicholas. He's a frequent contributor to NPR and also writes regularly for regional magazines, including Adirondack Life and the Adirondack Explorer. E-mail

Stories filed by Brian Mann

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The Culture of Climbing: Chasing the Pure Route

If you've driven through the Adirondacks in mid-summer, you've probably seen tiny figures dangling from massive cliffs. Rock climbers in the North Country have been braving the rain and bugs for nearly a century, pioneering some of the most rugged routes in the world. For many, time spent on the rock isn't just as a battle against nature. It's also a form of personal expression. Brian Mann has our story.  Go to full article

A Fife Tune From the Colonial Era

Listen to Gregory Veens rendition of Free America on the fife.  Go to full article

Battle of Valcour Island

The site of a historic Lake Champlain battle may get some renewed attention. Road improvements have made the memorial to the Battle of Valcour Island hard to spot. The state Department of Environmental Conservation is creating a small historic park near the southern tip of Valcour Island. The October 11, 1776, battle was an American defeat, but it was crucial to America's eventual success in the Revolutionary War. Re-enactors are bringing the brutal struggle to life. Brian Mann joined re-enactors on the island for last summer's recreation.  Go to full article

Study: High Mercury Levels in Adirondack Loons

The final report from a study of mercury levels in Adirondack loons is out. It finds that 17 percent of the birds scientists sampled last summer had high enough levels of mercury to affect their reproduction and behavior. The findings suggest that acid rain's effects on the Adirondack Park have spread throughout the food chain. But the long term effects are still to be determined. Brian Mann was with the researchers late last summer, and reported on what were then the preliminary findings.  Go to full article

State of Mental Health Care in the Prisons

A new report issued today argues that the 67,000 inmates in New York's prison system need better health care - and mental health counseling. Eleven percent of the state's prisoners are diagnosed with mental illness. Brian Mann talks with Jennifer Wynn, with the Correctional Association of New York, which issued the study.

The Department of Correctional Services declined to be interviewed to respond to the report, instead issuing a press release.  Go to full article

Exploring History Underwater

The state is considering new measures to protect lakes and rivers from invasive species - like zebra mussels. For years, environmentalists have warned that the zebra mussels threaten native species. But there's another threat too - to undewater history. Brian Mann joins a team of divers exploring Lake Champlain's underwater historic preserve.  Go to full article

Adirondacks In High Gear: A "Peak Bagger" Speed Climbs the 46 Highest Peaks

Brian Mann talks with Ted Keizer, a speed climber who is attempting to scale the 46 Adirondack mountains higher than 4,000 feet - in less than 4 days and 18 hours. For most hikers, climbing the region's highest peaks can take years or even decades. But is faster better?
 Go to full article

Terrorism Suspect Arrested In Montreal

An Algerian man will appear in court tomorrow in Montreal, after his arrest Friday on charges that he aided an Islamic terror cell. The man is accused of conspiring to blow up the U.S. embassy in Paris. Brian Mann has details:  Go to full article

Ausable Valley Voters Approve 17 Million Dollar Budget

Voters in the Ausable Valley school district narrowly approved a seventeen million dollar budget on Thursday. The spending plan will mean an eleven percent property tax increase. That price tag angered some locals, who urged the school district to make deeper program cuts. Brian Mann has details:  Go to full article

Ausable Valley School District Budget Up For Vote: 11 Percent Tax Increase

Voters in the Ausable Valley School District go to the polls today to vote on a new school budget. In May voters defeated a spending plan that would have meant a twenty-two percent property tax increase. School officials say this new budget will mean widespread program cuts--but a local taxpayers' group says the price tag is still too high. Brian Mann has our story.  Go to full article

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