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NCPR News Staff: Brian Mann

Adirondack Bureau Chief
Brian Mann grew up in Alaska, where he fell in love with public radio. In 1999, Brian moved to the Adirondacks and helped launch NCPR's news bureau at Paul Smiths College. "I love the chemistry of water and mountains," Brian says. "But I'm also pretty crazy about village life in the north country. It's the kind of place where you know your neighbors." Brian lives in Saranac Lake with wife Susan and son Nicholas. He's a frequent contributor to NPR and also writes regularly for regional magazines, including Adirondack Life and the Adirondack Explorer. E-mail

Stories filed by Brian Mann

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A Wilderness Marathon: Near Indian Lake, Blacktop Gives Way to Black Bears

Next Sunday, athletes from around the world will gather in Lake Placid for the Ironman triathlon. Race organizers say the top finishes will be shown live on a giant TV screen in Times Square. This weekend, a very different kind of race was held near Indian Lake. The "Damn Wakely Dam Ultra-Marathon" is a grassroots affair, with amateur runners testing themselves against bogs and creek-beds and boulders. Brian Mann was there and sends this race-day postcard.  Go to full article

Fundraising Reports: 45th Senate District Race; 110th Assembly District Race

Fundraising reports filed this month show that Assemblywoman Betty Little raised just over $60,000 for her bid to replace Senator Stafford. Little says she's happy with fundraising efforts so far. Martha Foley reports.  Go to full article

Senator Stafford: In Retirement, A Force To Be Reckoned With

Republican Senator Ron Stafford announced this spring that he'll step aside after nearly four decades in office. But documents filed this month with New York's Board of Elections, show that Senator Stafford's campaign war chest continues to grow. As Brian Mann reports, that money will help give the Senator political clout, long after his retirement.  Go to full article

Canadian Border Guards Near Plattsburgh Exposed to Tuberculosis: Health Officials Say Case Poses No Public Risk

Five Canadian workers at the Champlain border crossing, north of Plattsburgh, have been infected with tuberculosis. Officials say the source was a refugee, detained at the border for several days. As Brian Mann reports, dozens of travelers may have been exposed, but north country health officials say there's no cause for alarm.
Update: A spokesman for the US Customs service says there've been no recent cases of TB exposure among American border agents. Mike McMullen says infectious diseases are a well-known hazard for workers at the border. Testing and vaccinations are offered regularly. According to McMullen, the recent case won't affect safety procedures at the Champlain crossing.  Go to full article

The American Freedom Trail: An Adirondack Correction?

Brian Mann talks with Dr. Milton Sernett, author of North Star Country, Upstate New York and the Crusade for African American Freedom. It's a closer look at the Underground Railroad in New York. Sernett is vice chair of the New York State Freedom Trail commission.  Go to full article

Tour Bus Loses Control On Whiteface: Second Incident In A Week

A tour bus lost its brakes on a steep section of the road that climbs Whiteface Mountain on Tuesday. The bus, carrying 21 passengers, crashed through a section of the road's toll booth. As Brian Mann reports, passengers suffered only minor injuries.  Go to full article

Guilt-Free Boating: Environmental Officials Push Low-impact Outboard Motors

More than twelve thousand boats are registered on Lake Champlain, most of them using 2-stroke outboard engines. Environmental officials in New York and Vermont say those engines are noisy and inefficient, dumping as much as a third of their gas and oil directly into the water. The states are teaming up with the EPA and industry groups to phase out 2-stroke engines. But as Brian Mann reports, the effort is meeting resistance from some dealers:  Go to full article

Rock Climbing: A Sophisticated Art

Rock climbing in the Adirondacks. These days it's more sophisticated and much safer. But the reasons people climb are much the same. They go looking for adventure and amazing views, and a deeper connection to the mountains. Brian Mann climbed Hurricane Crag during the peak of last year's leaf season, and sends this report.  Go to full article

The Culture of Climbing: Chasing the Pure Route

If you've driven through the Adirondacks in mid-summer, you've probably seen tiny figures dangling from massive cliffs. Rock climbers in the North Country have been braving the rain and bugs for nearly a century, pioneering some of the most rugged routes in the world. For many, time spent on the rock isn't just as a battle against nature. It's also a form of personal expression. Brian Mann has our story.  Go to full article

A Fife Tune From the Colonial Era

Listen to Gregory Veens rendition of Free America on the fife.  Go to full article

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