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NCPR News Staff: Brian Mann

Adirondack Bureau Chief
Brian Mann grew up in Alaska, where he fell in love with public radio. In 1999, Brian moved to the Adirondacks and helped launch NCPR's news bureau at Paul Smiths College. "I love the chemistry of water and mountains," Brian says. "But I'm also pretty crazy about village life in the north country. It's the kind of place where you know your neighbors." Brian lives in Saranac Lake with wife Susan and son Nicholas. He's a frequent contributor to NPR and also writes regularly for regional magazines, including Adirondack Life and the Adirondack Explorer. E-mail

Stories filed by Brian Mann

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Lake Colden Outpost: Building for the Wilderness

When state officials announced that a new cabin was being built on Lake Colden, in the High Peaks, the decision was controversial. That part of the Adirondacks is a designated wilderness area. By law, that means human structures should be kept to a minimum. Supporters of the new cabin argued that it would be a vital tool for rangers and ski patrols who work in the backcountry. That claim was born out this winter. The Lake Colden outpost was used as a base of operations in two successful searches. Brian Mann visited Lake Colden in the fall of 2000, as construction was winding down.  Go to full article

Celebrating the Holidays with Ray Brook Inmates

Doing time is never easy, but the holidays can be especially hard. Last year, Brian Mann visited the state prison at Ray Brook, where inmates with good records enjoyed a rare celebration with their wives and children.  Go to full article

Settlement Clears Way for Lake George Shoreline Development

Developers in Lake George will build fifty-five new timeshare condominiums on the lakeshore. The move follows an out-of-court settlement, reached with the Lake George Association--a non-profit group that had fought to block the plan. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article

Feeling the Chill: International Students in the North Country, part 2

In the next two weeks, the north country's colleges and universities will empty out as students head home for the winter break. For international students, the holiday offers a rare chance to visit with family in their home countries. But this year, many foreign students are afraid to make the trip. As Brian Mann reports, they fear that US immigration officials won't let them back into the country.  Go to full article

Feeling the Chill: International Students in the North Country, part 1

North country colleges and universities are home to thousands of international students. They bring important revenue to their schools--and important diversity. But in the months since September 11, foreign students have faced closer scrutiny than ever before. As Brian Mann reports, some educators fear that new restrictions and monitoring could send the best international students to other countries.  Go to full article
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Conservatives Angered by Pataki Support of Hudson Dredging

The decision to dredge toxic PCBs from the Hudson River could help to shape the upcoming governor's race. Republican Governor George Pataki supported the clean-up, a move that will win support from many downstate voters. But Pataki's position has angered many upstate conservatives. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article

Law Would Ease Borrowing Restrictions for Adirondack Localities

A new law will make it easier for many Adirondack towns to borrow money. The legislation--sponsored by Senator Ron Stafford--reduces the level of state oversight for towns and school districts. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article

Hudson River PCB Dredging Plan Receives EPA Go-Ahead

The Environmental Protection Agency is moving forward with a plan to dredge more than a million pounds of PCBs from the Hudson River. As Brian Mann reports, the official "record of decision" does not include controversial performance standards demanded by General Electric.  Go to full article

Lawmakers Sit on Conservation Funding After September 11

Conservation groups say New York's legislature is withholding on tens of millions of dollars that should be spent on environmental projects. The Environmental Protection Fund is one of hundreds of programs derailed by the September 11 attacks. As Brian Mann reports, loss of the money could affect a deal in the Adirondacks that would add 26,000 acres to state forest land.  Go to full article

Shoreline Development Boom Within the Adirondack Park Prompts Zoning Debates

One of the great myths of the Adirondack Park is that state zoning regulations restrict or at least shape most development on private land. In fact, much of the real estate boom of the last decade has taken place on shorelines. Thousands of homes have been built in lakefront areas that are largely exempt from Park Agency control. As Brian Mann reports, critics of the zoning plan say the result has been a disaster for lakes and ponds in the Adirondacks.  Go to full article

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